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Category: Linux

Installing SQL Server On Ubuntu 18.04

Max Trinidad shows us how to install SQL Server on Ubuntu 18.04, though he leads off with a warning:

This has been an issue for sometime until now. I found the following link that help me install SQL Server on the latest Ubuntu 18.04:

https://askubuntu.com/questions/1032532/how-do-i-install-ms-sql-for-ubuntu-18-04-lts

But, there are few missing steps which can help ease the burden of errors. At the same time, the information is a little out-dated.

But, it works with the following adjustments.

Please Understand!!  This is NOT approved by Microsoft.  Use this method for Test Only!!

I’m waiting somewhat impatiently for Microsoft and Hortonworks to support Ubuntu 18.04.

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Missing @@SERVERNAME On Linux

Steve Jones fixes a naming issue on his SQL on Linux installation:

I setup a new instance of SQL Server on Linux some time ago. At the time, the Linux machine didn’t have any Samba running, and no real “name” on the network. As a result, after installing SQL Server I got a NULL when running SELECT @@SERVERNAME.

The fix is easy. It’s what you’d do if you had the wrong name.

Read on for the command, and don’t forget to restart the database engine afterward.

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Configuring SQL Agent For Linux

Steve Jones shows how to install and configure the SQL Agent for Linux:

When I first started playing with this version, I noticed that SQL Agent was disabled. That’s not great, since SQL Agent is a great tool for various tasks in SQL Server. I can’t start the agent from here, as the underlying implementation is different, and I’m not really a host OS admin when connecting in SSMS.

After checking which patch level I was at (CU6), I changed to my Linux console, and ran the configuration utility. For Linux, this is mssql-conf.

It’s not an overly complicated process but the process is a bit different from Windows, so check it out.

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mssql-cli Update

Alan Yu announces an update to mssql-cli:

GDPR compliance

As many of us are familiar with, GDPR is approaching and we made some updates. In the past, file history stored entire T-SQL queries. However, if the query contained any secrets or passwords, it wasn’t smart enough to scrub those out. This is no longer the case, and now file history has been updated to no longer store secrets or passwords.

In addition, we have added 24-hour rotation of UserID when we collect telemetry.

Read on for other improvements.

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SQL Server 2017 On Linux: The Azure VM Method

Prashanth Jayaram shows how to spin up an Azure VM running SQL Server 2017 on Linux:

To create the VMs, you need to go through these four steps:

  1. Basics to configure basic setting of the VM

  2. Size to choose the VM machine size

  3. Settings to configure the features. In this case, the default values are used. You just need to click the Next button to proceed further

  4. Purchase

Once it’s running, Prashanth shows how to connect via PuTTY and configure the service.

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SQL Server Powershell Module On PowerShell 6 Core

Drew Furgiuele is ready to retire to his fainting couch:

So, I bit: the tweet he referenced was announcing a new version of the SQL Server module (21.0.17240). Here’s a quick list of the updates included:

  • Added Get-SqlBackupHistory cmdlet
  • Ported PS Provider to .NET Core for PowerShell 6 support 
  • Ported a subset of cmdlets to .NET Core for PowerShell 6 support 
  • Powershell 6 support on macOS and Linux in Preview. 
  • To use SqlServer provider on macOS and Linux mount it using a new PSDrive. Examples in documentation.
  • Removed restriction of 64-bit OS for this module. Note: Invoke-Sqlcmd cmdlet is the only cmdlet not supported on 32-bit OS.

The bold lines are my emphasis: with PowerShell 6 support for Linux and macOS, that opens up new avenues for connecting to and automating SQL Server from any platform. This is exciting stuff. I couldn’t wait to take it for a spin, so I set up a quick demo environment to test it out.

It’s not perfect but it did give Drew the vapors, which is a good sign that they’re on the right track.

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The Basics Of Bash: Writing Data

Mark Wilkinson hits us with some basic Bash output management:

If you have experience with PowerShell, some properties of Bash variables will feel familiar. In Bash, variables are denoted with a $ just like in PowerShell, but unlike PowerShell the $ is only needed when they are being referenced. When you are assigning a value to a variable, the $ is left off:

#!/bin/bashset -eset -umy_var="World"printf "Hello ${my_var}\n"

Above we assigned a value to my_var without using the $, but when we then referenced it in the printf statement, we had to use a $. We also enclosed the variable name in curly braces. This is not required in all cases, but it is a good idea to get in the habit of using them. In cases where you are using positional parameters above 9 (we’ll talk about this later) or you are using a variable in the middle of a string the braces are required, but there is no harm in adding them every time you use a variable in a string.

The basic syntax is pretty familiar to most programming languages, and there’s nothing scary about outputs, even when Mark starts getting into streams.

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Installing Docker On Linux

Mark Broadbent shows how to install Docker on Linux Mint:

A web search will almost certainly point you to lots of similar posts, mostly (if not) all of which start instructing you to add unofficial or unrecognized sources, keys etc. Therefore my intention with this post is not to replace official documentation, but to make the process as simple as possible, whilst still pointing to all the official documentation so that you can be confident you are not breaking security or other such things!

You can head over to the following Docker page Get Docker CE for Ubuntu for the initial setup and updates, but for simplicity, you can follow along below.

The installation instructions will also work for Ubuntu and other related variants.

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Bash For The Powershell-Minded

Mark Wilkinson has started a new series on Bash.  His first post is an introduction to the scripting language:

Bash (the Bourne Again Shell) was created in 1989 for the GNU Project as a free replacement for the Unix Bourne shell. Most modern Linux systems use Bash as their default command line shell, so if you have ever dropped to a command line on a Linux system, you have probably used Bash. Just like PowerShell, Bash is both a scripting language and a command shell/interpreter. So not only can you execute commands in an interactive shell session, but you can also write scripts that incorporate multiple commands.

Once you get your hands dirty with Bash you’ll notice a lot of features that were incorporated into PowerShell. Things like command substitution: $(Get-Date) were directly pulled from Bash $(date). Other features will look familiar as well, like the ability to pipe multiple commands together.

One thing you need to understand right away is that Bash is string based, not object based like PowerShell. This means you’ll find yourself doing a lot more string processing to get tasks done. Things like string splitting will be much more common. Bash does support objects, like arrays, but few if any commands output an array. As we go through this series you’ll see that this might not be as limiting as it sounds.

The best part about learning Bash is that you can then get into arguments about Bash vs ksh vs zsh.

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