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Category: Linux

Getting SQL Server with Current Linux Distributions

Tejas Shah announces the availability of SQL Server 2019 on the latest long-term releases of Ubuntu, Red Hat, and SuSE:

SQL Server team has been working diligently in adding support for current Linux distributions. To this end, the team announced support for SQL Server 2019 on RHEL 8.0Ubuntu 18.04 and SLES 12 SP5 within last quarter.

The team is glad to announce that the Azure marketplace PAYG (Pay As You Go) images for SQL Server 2019 on RHEL 8.0, Ubuntu 18.04 and SLES 12 SP5 have been made generally available. You can deploy these images to get the latest of both SQL Server 2019 functionality and operating system improvements.

With Ubuntu 20.04 coming out soon, it’ll be interesting to see when that officially becomes supported.

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sqltxls Now Supported Cross-Platform

Randolph West has made sql2xls work on Linux and MacOS:

Last year I released sql2xls, a free open-source tool which lets you throw a bunch of scripts into a folder, run them automatically against SQL Server and get the results back in a nicely-formatted Excel file, one tab per script.

A year later, I am happy to announce that the tool now runs cross-platform. You can compile and run it with .NET Core 3.1 LTS to run on Windows, macOS, and Linux. It uses the new Microsoft.Data.SqlClient library from NuGet, as well as the latest beta of ClosedXML.

Read on for a few more tips and go check the project out.

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Tips and Traps with PowerShell 7

Jeffrey Hicks takes us through some of the tricky parts of migrating to Powershell 7:

A long established community best practice in PowerShell scripting is not using command and parameter aliases. In a cross-platform world, this is even more critical. You may have been in the habit of using Sort in your code in place of Sort-Object. I know I have. I didn’t mind bending the no alias rule abit because there was nothing cryptic about Sort.

But in the Linux world, sort is a native command. There is no PowerShell alias. If your code uses sort, on Linux it will call the native command which will most likely break your code.

Read on for several more hints.

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SQL Server 2019 Supports Ubuntu 18.04, SLES 12 SP5

Tejas Shah announces a couple new versions of Linux distributions SQL Server 2019 supports:

We are also glad to announce the availability of SQL Server 2019 CU3 container image build on Ubuntu 18.04. It is fully supported for production use. You can read about how to deploy the container at following page.

Running SQL Server 2019 CU3 container with Ubuntu 18.04 base: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/linux/quickstart-install-connect-docker?view=sql-server-ver15&p…

You could run SQL Server on these versions of Ubuntu and SUSE, but now you get production support, making it prudent to run on these. Ubuntu 20.4 is coming out soon, so we’ll see when that gets supported.

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Pulling R Packages from Fedora

Inaki Ucar has an interesting project:

Bringing R packages to Fedora (in fact, to any distro) is an Herculean task, especially considering the rate at which CRAN grows nowadays. So I am happy to announce the cran2copr project, which is an attempt to maintain binary RPM repos for most of CRAN (~15k packages as of Feb. 2020) in an automated way using Fedora Copr.

Click through for installation instructions if you’re using an RPM-based Linux distribution like Fedora or CentOS. H/T R-Bloggers.

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Using Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 in Windows 10

Max Trinidad is excited about Windows Subsystem for Linux 2:

First, I love WSL (Windows Subsystem for Linux)! It’s a great addition to Windows 10, and everyone should learn how to use it.

To get started, follow the instructions on how to get your WSL 1 Linux Distro installed. And, begin with installing Ubuntu 18.04.

Now, get Docker Desktop (), which can be installed in Windows 10 RTM Build 18363 with WSL 1.

One of the key benefits around WSL 2 is that your Docker containers will run natively rather than through a VM. That’s a pretty big deal in terms of performance and production-readiness. That Docker capability is currently in preview, but I’d expect it to make its way to production sooner than later.

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Deploying a Big Data Cluster to a Multi-Node kubeadm Cluster

Mohammad Darab shows how we can deploy a SQL Server Big Data Cluster on a multi-node kubeadm cluster:

There are a few assumptions before we get started:

1. You have at least 3 virtual machines running with the minimum hardware requirements
2. All your virtual machines are running Ubuntu Server 16.04 and have OpenSSH installed
3. All the virtual machines have static IPs and on the same subnet
4. All the virtual machines are updated and have been rebooted

Mohammad shows how to set up the cluster, configure Kubernetes, and then install Big Data Clusters. Definitely worth the read if you’re interested in building a Big Data Cluster on-premises.

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Registering a Raspberry Pi 4 as an IoT Edge Device

Hasan Savran takes us through turning a Raspberry Pi 4 into an Azure IoT Edge device:

You can buy all type of sensors and connect them to Raspberry Pi. Then you can use Python or .NET Core to write small applications to check your connected sensors and read data from the sensors. If you like to push this data to store or analyze in Azure, then you need to make Raspberry Pi ready by installing couple of applications.
      Installing an application in Windows, is not a big deal for me. I had to install and configure all the applications in Linux in this project. First thing we need to do is copying some files to register Microsoft GPG key and software repository feed. To do that, we will use the curl command. Curl is used for transferring data using various protocols including HTTP/S. We are going to use it to copy some files from Internet to local storage. It’s a fancy copy tool.

There are a few steps involved, but nothing too onerous. I think I know where Hasan is going with this, too.

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Change Data Capture and Replication on Linux

Tejas Shah announces transactional replication and change data capture for SQL Server 2017 on Linux:

With SQL Server 2019, we introduced support for replication and CDC features for SQL Server on Linux by bringing in relevant components and subsystems within SQL Server core engine package. This support includes Snapshot replication, Transactional replication and CDC. Peer-to-peer transactional replication, merge replication and Oracle publishing are not supported.  

Today we are glad to announce that we have brought the replication and CDC features to SQL Server 2017, starting with Cumulative update 18 (CU18).

Tejas has a few links, but the key is just to update your server (or spin up a new Docker container with the latest CU and swap external database files over to it).

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Tools for Using SQL Server on Linux

Kellyn Pot’vin-Gorman has a list of tools you can use to make working with SQL Server on Linux a bit easier:

Along with the above versions of Linux distributions, SQL Server 2019 is supported in a container scenario using a Docker image.  Running a SQL Server database inside a Docker engine with Linux offers more flexibility, faster recovery, and quicker deployments, including deployments into the Azure cloud. For those becoming familiar with Linux, Docker for Windows or Mac gives you the option to run a Docker engine on your workstation with SQL Server 2019 on Linux.

Along with Docker technology, orchestration can be achieved, both managing and deploying SQL Server containers on Linux using Red Hat Open shift or Kubernetes. This includes SQL Server 2019 Big Data Clusters (BDC), fully scalable clusters with SQL Server, Spark, and Hadoop File System (HDFS). BDCs provide the ability to read, write, and analyze big data with T-SQL or Spark, and you can combine big data and relational data, too.

The set of tools just happens to be almost exactly the same set of tools as for Windows, but there are a few differences.

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