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Category: Linux

Moving SQL Server Data File Locations on Linux

Nisarg Upadhyay wants to move files around in SQL Server on Linux:

In this article, I am going to explain how we can move the SQL database files to another location in Ubuntu 18.04. For the demonstration, I have installed Ubuntu 18.04, SQL Server 2019 on Linux on my workstation. You can read SQL Server 2019 on Linux with Ubuntu to understand the step-by-step installation process of the SQL Server 2019 on Linux. We will move database files of AdventureWorks2019 and Wideworldimportors database.

Click through for the process. It’s really similar to Windows in this respect. And, well, in most respects.

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Using Active Directory Authentication for SQL Server on Linux

Jamie Wick takes us through a lengthy process:

SQL Server has been supported on several Linux distributions for a couple of years now. For some people, the primary stumbling block to implementing SQL Server on Linux is the need to retain Active Directory (ie Windows-based) authentication for their database users and applications. Below we’ll go over how to join a Linux server (Ubuntu release 20.04) with SQL Server 2019 to an Active Directory domain, and then configure SQL Server to allow Windows-based logins.

There are quite a few steps here and I appreciate Jamie providing us an image-filled, step-by-step process.

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Downgrading SQL Server on Linux

Sreekanth Bandarla wants to roll back cumulative updates on Linux:

Of course you can get this info from SQL or several other ways in Linux. Okay, now we know we got SQL Server 2019 CU5 running on this server to work with. Let’s just assume CU5 broke something in my database and I want to go back to CU4. How do I do that?

Click through to see how to do this for Red Hat (or any system using yum). Debian-based don’t have a downgrade option, but you can use apt-get install mssql-server=[version number] instead.

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Installing Azure Data Studio on CentOS

Sreekanth Bandarla walks us through installation and usage of Azure Data Studio on CentOS:

Okay…now what? Where to locate the executable and how do I open Azure data studio in CentOS? GUI in CentOS is not as user friendly as you can see in some other Linux OSs (Mint for eg or few other Ubuntu flavors of Linux). In windows you can locate the program in start menu or even in few desktop experience Linux distributions it’s extremely easy to just search in application center, but that was not the case for me in CentOS 7.

Click through to see how to install and open ADS on a Red Hat-based system.

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Counting Table Tennis Ball Bounces

Evgeni Chasnovski has some fun counting:

On May 7th 2020 Dan made a successful attempt to beat a world record for the longest duration to control a table tennis ball with a bat. He surpassed current record duration of 5h2m37s by 18 minutes and 27 seconds for a total of 5h21m4s. He also live streamed the event on his “TableTennisDaily” YouTube channel, which later was uploaded (important note for the future: this video is a result of live stream and not a “shot and uploaded” one). During cheering for Dan in real time I got curious about actual number of bounces he made.

And thus the quest begins.

As counting manually is error-prone and extremely boring, I decided to do this programmatically. The idea of solution is straightforward: somehow extract audio from the world record video, detect bounces (as they have distinctive sound) and count them.

Click through for the process as well as a link to a Git repo with the Python code.

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mssql-cli Generally Available on MacOS and Linux

Alan Yu announces the general availability of mssql-cli outside of Windows:

We are excited to announce that mssql-cli is now generally available on macOS and Linux.

mssql-cli is an open source and cross-platform command-line tool (CLI) to manage SQL Server on-prem and on the cloud. We are a proud member of the dbcli family of open source command line tools to manage relational databases.

If you are a user of sqlcmd, you will love the interactive and modern design components in mssql-cli. With this release, you will also be able to use mssql-cli in non-interactive scenarios such as scripting and automation. Read on to learn more about how mssql-cli will help improve your productivity through a modern CLI experience.

If you love the command line (or simply need to SSH into a box from time to time), give this product a try.

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sqltxls Now Supported Cross-Platform

Randolph West has made sql2xls work on Linux and MacOS:

Last year I released sql2xls, a free open-source tool which lets you throw a bunch of scripts into a folder, run them automatically against SQL Server and get the results back in a nicely-formatted Excel file, one tab per script.

A year later, I am happy to announce that the tool now runs cross-platform. You can compile and run it with .NET Core 3.1 LTS to run on Windows, macOS, and Linux. It uses the new Microsoft.Data.SqlClient library from NuGet, as well as the latest beta of ClosedXML.

Read on for a few more tips and go check the project out.

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Getting SQL Server with Current Linux Distributions

Tejas Shah announces the availability of SQL Server 2019 on the latest long-term releases of Ubuntu, Red Hat, and SuSE:

SQL Server team has been working diligently in adding support for current Linux distributions. To this end, the team announced support for SQL Server 2019 on RHEL 8.0Ubuntu 18.04 and SLES 12 SP5 within last quarter.

The team is glad to announce that the Azure marketplace PAYG (Pay As You Go) images for SQL Server 2019 on RHEL 8.0, Ubuntu 18.04 and SLES 12 SP5 have been made generally available. You can deploy these images to get the latest of both SQL Server 2019 functionality and operating system improvements.

With Ubuntu 20.04 coming out soon, it’ll be interesting to see when that officially becomes supported.

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Tips and Traps with PowerShell 7

Jeffrey Hicks takes us through some of the tricky parts of migrating to Powershell 7:

A long established community best practice in PowerShell scripting is not using command and parameter aliases. In a cross-platform world, this is even more critical. You may have been in the habit of using Sort in your code in place of Sort-Object. I know I have. I didn’t mind bending the no alias rule abit because there was nothing cryptic about Sort.

But in the Linux world, sort is a native command. There is no PowerShell alias. If your code uses sort, on Linux it will call the native command which will most likely break your code.

Read on for several more hints.

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