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Category: Linux

Azure Cloud Shell

Mark Broadbent gives us an introduction to Azure Cloud Shell:

There are two ways to access Azure Cloud Shell, the first being directly through the Azure Portal itself. Once authenticated, look to the top right of the Portal and you should see a grouping of icons and in particular, one that looks very much like a DOS prompt (have no fear, DOS is nowhere to be seen).

The second method to access Azure Cloud Shell is by jumping directly to it via shell.azure.com which will require you to authenticate to your subscription before launching. There is an ever so slight difference between each method. Accessing the Shell via the Azure Portal will not require you to specify your Azure directory context (assuming you have several) since your Portal will have already defaulted to one, whereas with the direct URL method that obviously doesn’t happen.

Read the whole thing.

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Azure SQL Linux VM Configuration with dbatools

Rob Sewell walks us through configuring SQL Server on an Azure VM running Linux, installing Powershell, and using dbatools:

I had set the Network security rules to accept connections only from my static IP using variables in the Build Pipeline. I use MobaXterm as my SSH client. Its a free download. I click on sessions

There wasn’t much I could excerpt here, but this is a heavily screenshot-driven tutorial.

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Scripting with Variables in Bash

Kellyn Pot’vin-Gorman shows how easy it can be to write Bash scripts with variables:

Let’s start with a use case of deploying a Azure database. When a customer is making the decision to build it out, there are specific information needed to deploy and this will continue to change as the Azure catalog is updated with new offerings. For our example, we’ll stick to a very small snippet of code, as the values we dynamically create will be reused throughout the script. This example will skip past the actual server creation, etc. and just focus on the user database creation. The Server, zone and subscription are all set in the default steps earlier on so as not to have to repeat it throughout each resource deployment step.

There’s a lot to Bash and its programming guide is a lot of sheets of paper (ask me how I know), but this is one of those places where you can get a nice benefit easily.

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SQL Server 2019 CTP 2.5

The SQL Server team has a new CTP out:

We’re excited to announce the monthly release of SQL Server 2019 community technology preview (CTP) 2.5. SQL Server 2019 is the first release of SQL Server to closely integrate Apache Spark™ and the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS) with SQL Server in a unified data platform.

This is a big one for me: lots of changes in Big Data Clusters, PolyBase on Linux, and a Java SDK. Looks like I am going to be pretty busy.

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Custom kubectl Plugin: Connect to SQL Server

Andrew Pruski shows how to create custom kubectl plugins:

When I deploy SQL Server to Kubernetes I usually create a load balanced service so that I can get an external IP to connect from my local machine to SQL running in the cluster. So how about creating a plugin that will grab that external IP and drop it into mssql-cli?

Let’s have a go at creating that now.

Click through for two demos including the appropriately-named kubectl prusk.

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SQL on Linux with Local Repositories

Kevin Chant explains how you can use local repositories to make installing SQL Server on Linux easier when you have servers lacking Internet access:

Now, some of you more experienced Linux users probably know there is another way to do this. When I previously had to create a Hadoop environment I had to implement a local repository.

In other words, I copied the contents of the online repository locally and created my own repository on a server.

That way I could manage installing software onto multiple clients using the same secured files in a local location instead of online. Which means I could install using the same method I would have done with internet access.

Kevin provides links and some notes on the process.

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Using Windows Authentication on Non-Windows Devices

Drew Furgiuele shows us how to connect to SQL Server using Windows Authentication if you’re not coming from a Windows device:

SQL Server supports different kinds of authentication mechanisms and protocols: the older NTLM protocol, and Kerberos. A lot of people cringe when you mention Kerberos because, well, Kerberos is hard. It’s arcane, it’s complex, and it’s hard to even describe unless you use it on the regular.

Simply put, it’s a ticketing and key system: you, a user, requests a ticket from a store, usually by authenticating to it via a username and password. If you succeed, you get a ticket that get stored within your local machine. Then, when you want to access a resource (like a SQL Server), the client re-ups with the store you got your initial ticket from (to make sure it’s still valid), and you get a “key” to access the resource. That key is then forwarded onto the resource, allowing you to access the thing you were trying to connect to. It’s way, way more complex than this, with lots of complicated terms and moving parts, so I’m doing a lot of hand-waving, but that’s the core of the system. If that kind of stuff excites you, go Google it, and I promise you’ll get more than you ever bargained for.

Kerberos is a scary beast to me, mostly because I don’t spend enough time working directly with it.

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Pacemaker Changes Affecting SQL on Linux

Randolph West has an important message if you’re running SQL Server on Linux:

Heads up for SQL Server on Linux folks using availability groups and Pacemaker. Pacemaker 1.1.18 has been out for a while now, but it’s worth mentioning that there was a behaviour change in how it fails-over a cluster. While the new behaviour is considered “correct”, it may affect you if you’ve configured availability groups on a previous version (specifically 1.1.16).

Click through for more details and what you can do about this.

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SQL Server and Ubuntu 18.04

Randolph West confirms that SQL Server on Linux will run on Ubuntu 18.04 even though it is not (yet) supported:

Although these screenshots show SQL Server 2019 preview CTP 2.3, this also applies to SQL Server 2017 on 18.04.2, because that’s what I had installed before upgrading the SQL Server version. However, as my friend Jay Falck pointed out on Twitter, Microsoft has stated publicly that it is not yet certified for production use:

Important, this does not change the support state of SQL Server 2017 on Ubuntu 18.04. Work to certify Ubuntu 18.04 with SQL Server 2017 is planned and we will announce when it will be supported for production use on this page. Until such as an announcement occurs, SQL Server 2017 on Ubuntu 18.04 should be considered experimental and for non-production use only.

Read on for Randolph’s thoughts on the issue.

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SqlServer Module Now with Invoke-Sqlcmd

Aaron Nelson alerts us to a new preview of the SqlServer Powershell module:

If you’re still on an earlier version of PSCore and are unable to install PSCore 6.2 right now, you can still download preview of the SqlServer module to get the latest fixes and new features.  You just won’t be able to use the Invoke-Sqlcmd cmdlet.

Another quick thing to note is that this is like a v.0.0.1 of Invoke-SqlCmd on PSCore; it does not have all the bells & whistles of the version of Invoke-Sqlcmd for [full blown] Windows PowerShell.  Obviously, more features will be added over time, but the basic functionality was ready to for customers to start “kicking the tires”.

Read on for more notes and the link to check this all out.

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