Learn Extended Events With This Workbench

Phil Factor gives us a great walkthrough of Extended Events:

A lot of the information about the way that SQL Server is working that can only be provided by Extended Events (XEvents). It is such a versatile system that it can provide a lot more than would otherwise require SQL Trace. If done well, Extended Events are so economical to use that it takes very little CPU. For many tasks, it requires less effort on the part of the user than SQL Trace.

Extended Events (XEvents) aren’t particularly easy to use, and nothing that involves having to use XML is likely to be intuitive: In fact, many DBAs compare XML unfavourably in terms of its friendliness with a cornered rat. SSMS’s user-interface for Extended Events, thankfully, removes a lot of the bite. For the beginner to XEvents with a background in SQL, it is probably best to collect a few useful ‘recipes’ and grow from that point. Templates and snippets are invaluable.

Phil’s workbenches (especially those written with Robyn Page) are fantastic ways of digging into a topic of interest.

Related Posts

Tips When Writing Extended Events To Files

Jason Brimhall has some tips to help you use the file target in Extended Events: This first little tip comes from a painful experience. It is common sense to only try and create files in a directory that exists, but sometimes that directory has to be different on different systems. Then comes a little copy […]

Read More

Monitoring When Databases Go Offline

Jason Brimhall shows how you can create an extended event to track whenever databases go offline: The other day, I shared an article showing how to audit database offline events via the default trace. Today, I will show an easier method to both audit and monitor for offline events. What is the difference between audit and […]

Read More

Categories

September 2018
MTWTFSS
« Aug Oct »
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930