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Category: Extended Events

Troubleshooting Deadlocks using Extended Events

Jamie Wick helps us figure out what’s causing deadlocks:

Recently I started getting random alerts that a job on one of the SQL servers was failing because of a deadlock problem.

The source of the problem wasn’t immediately discernible as there wasn’t any pattern to when the job was failing. Troubleshooting was further complicated by the database being written/maintained by a 3rd party vendor that encrypts all of their stored procedures.

So… How to find out what was causing the deadlock?

Extended Events are an ideal solution for this situation.

Read on to learn how.

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When Extended Event Loss Occurs

Jonathan Kehayias explains when Extended Events will discard an event:

There are three specific session options that determine how large of an event an event session can actually collect, and one that controls how events are dropped when the buffer memory for the event session is full or under pressure. All four of these matter when we are talking about collecting events that could generate a large event payload and we want to minimize the chance that we could potentially drop an event.

Read on to see these settings in action.

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Extended Events Files on Linux

Jason Brimhall looks at an error when trying to set up an Extended Events session on Linux:

This will fail before the query really even gets out of the gate. Why? The proc xp_create_subdir cannot create the directory because it requires elevated permissions. The fix for that is easy enough – grant permissions to write to the Database directory after creating it while in sudo mode. I will get to that in just a bit. Let’s see what the errors would look like for now.

Msg 22048, Level 16, State 1, Line 15
xp_create_subdir() returned error 5, ‘Access is denied.’
Msg 25602, Level 17, State 23, Line 36
The target, “5B2DA06D-898A-43C8-9309-39BBBE93EBBD.package0.event_file”, encountered a configuration error during initialization. Object cannot be added to the event session. The operating system returned error 5: ‘Access is denied.
‘ while creating the file ‘C:\Database\XE\PREEMPTIVE_OS_PIPEOPS_0_132072025269680000.xel’

Read on for the solution.

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Auditing Databases in Use

Jason Brimhall shows how you can use Extended Events to figure out if that database is still in use:

Here we can see there are indeed some databases that are still in use on this server. If we are looking to retire the instance, or migrate relevant databases to a new server, we have better information about how to go about planning that work. Based on this data, I would be able to retire the ProtossZealot database but would be required to do something with the ZergRush and BroodWar databases. In the case of the ProtossZealot database that is not being used, we now have evidence to present back to the team that the database is not used. It is now up to those insisting on keeping it around to justify its existence and document why it must remain in tact.

Click through for the script Jason used to determine this.

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Extended Event Filters Outlive Sessions

Dave Bland ran into an interesting problem during a demo:

Recently during a demo at a SQL Saturday the query to pull the Extended Event session data, didn’t return the expected results. The session I used for the demo was the create database statement.

Prior to the session, I deleted the Create Database session, however did not delete the target files because they are part of the demo.  Then I recreated the session, just as I had done before.  However, this time was there was a difference when I attempted to read the target data.  The entry for the newly created database was not showing up when I used the GUI, however was showing up when I read the XML.  During the session, I was not able to figure out why that was the case.

Click through to see the root cause and how Dave fixed the problem.

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Tracking xp_cmdshell Executions

Jason Brimhall shows how you can see when someone calls xp_cmdshell, including the call details:

What was the wait_type? Well, the obscure wait_type was called PREEMPTIVE_OS_PIPEOPS. What causes this wait? As it turns out, this is a generic wait that is caused by SQL pipe related activities such as xp_cmdshell.

Knowing this much information however does not get us to the root cause of this particular problem for this client. How do we get there? This is another case for Extended Events (XEvents).

Read on for two ways to approach this, both using Extended Events.

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Finding High-Resource Queries with Extended Events

Grant Fritchey shows how you can create an extended event which identifies high-CPU queries:

A question that comes up on the forums all the time: Which query used the most CPU. You may see variations on, memory, I/O, or just resources in general. However, people want to know this information, and it’s not readily apparent how to get it.

While you can look at what’s in cache through the DMVs to see the queries there, you don’t get any real history and you don’t get any detail of when the executions occurred. You can certainly take advantage of the Query Store for this kind of information. However, even that data is aggregated by hour. If you really want a detailed analysis of which query used the most CPU, you need to first set up an Extended Events session and then consume that data.

Click through for the script.

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Max Dispatch Latency in Extended Events

Dave Bland takes us through the Max_Dispatch_Latency property for an Extended Event:

You would logically think that the minimum setting would be zero seconds.  If you think that way, you are correct.  However, 0 does not mean 0 seconds.  When this is set to 0 it means the event will stay in the buffer until the buffer becomes full.  This is the same set setting the “Unlimited” option you see below. Given this, the true minimum is one second.

Read on to see what it does and why it can be important.

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Azure SQL Database and Extended Events

Dave Bland shows how to set up and read an extended event file on Azure SQL Database:

This first step when using T-SQL to read Extended Files that are stored in an Azure Storage Account is to create a database credential.  Of course the credential will provide essential security information to connect to the Azure Storage Account.  This first data point you will need is the URL to a blog storage container in you storage account.  If you look below, you can see where you would place your storage account name and the blob storage container name.

Dave gives us the grand tour of the configuration process, including where things differ between on-prem SQL Server and Azure SQL Database (which is quite a bit)

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Safely Dropping Extended Event Sessions

Denis Gobo shows how you can drop an extended event session without risk of a “does not exist” error:

The other day someone checked in some code and every now and then the build would fail with the error

Msg 15151, Level 16, State 19, Line 51
Cannot drop the event session ‘ProcsExecutions’, because it does not exist or you do not have permission.

I decided to take a look at the code and saw what the problem was. I will recreate the code here and then show you what needs to be changed.  This post will not go into what Extended Events are, you can look that up in the SQL Server  Extended Events documentation

I like these IF NOT EXISTS checks on release scripts as that makes them re-runnable. Even if you don’t use continuous integration for release scripts, you may sometimes hit F5 one too many times.

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