Formatting Summary Tables In R

Laura Ellis shows us how to create formatted tables using the formattable package in R:

We are going to narrow down the data set to focus on 4 key health metrics. Specifically the prevalence of obesity, tobacco use, cardiovascular disease and obesity. We are then going to select only the indicator name and yearly KPI value columns. Finally we are going to make extra columns to display the 2011 to 2016 yearly average and the 2011 to 2016 metric improvements.

Tables are an area of data visualization that we tend to forget at our own peril.

Tol Color Schemes In R

Jason C. Fisher walks us through a color scheme generator based on Paul Tol’s research;

Choosing colors for a graphic is a bit like taking a trip down the rabbit hole, that is, it can take much longer than expected and be both fun and frustrating at the same time. Striking a balance between colors that look good to you and your audience is important. Keep in mind that color blindness affects many individuals throughout the world and it is incumbent on you to choose a color scheme that works in color-blind vision. Luckily there are a number of excellent R packages that address this very issue, such as the colorspace,RColorBrewer, and viridis packages. And because this is R, where diversity is king, why not offer one more function for creating color blind friendly palettes.

Let me introduce the GetTolColors function in the R-package inlmisc. This function generates a vector of colors from qualitative, diverging, and sequential color schemes by Paul Tol (2018). The original inspiration for developing this function came from Peter Carl’s blog post describing color schemes from an older issue of Paul Tol’s Technical Note (issue 2.2, released Dec. 2012). And the qualitative color schemes described in his blog post found their way into the ptol_pal function in the R-package ggthemes. My intent with this document is to exhibit the latest Tol color schemes (issue 3.0, released May 2018) and show that they are not only visually pleasing but also well thought out.

Read on for step-by-step instructions and to see some of the palettes.  The package authors have taken care in color design, so check it out.

Labeling Line Ends In ggplot2

Simon Jackson shows how you can use the secondary axis to label line endings in ggplot2:

Now we can use scale_y_*, with the argument sec.axis to create a second axis on the right, with numbers to be displayed at breaks, defined by our vector of line ends:

ggplot(d, aes(age, circumference, color = Tree)) + geom_line() + scale_y_continuous(sec.axis = sec_axis(~ ., breaks = d_ends))

This is good.  I’d really prefer to show the labels instead of the value; that way it’d be possible to eliminate the legend altogether.  H/T R-Bloggers.

Always Encrypted With Secure Enclaves In SQL Server 2019

Jakub Szymaszek walks us through Virtualization Based Security memory enclaves in Windows Server 2019 and SQL Server 2019:

Today, we are super excited to announce that you can now try and evaluate Always Encrypted with secure enclaves in the preview of SQL Server 2019.

Always Encrypted with secure enclaves in SQL Server 2019 preview uses an enclave technology called Virtualization Based Security (VBS) memory enclaves in the upcoming version of Windows (Windows Server 2019 and Windows 10, version 1809), which is currently also in preview. A VBS enclave is an isolated region of memory within the address space of a user-mode process. The isolation of VBS enclaves is provided by the Windows hypervisor, which makes VBS enclaves appear as black boxes, not only to the processes containing them, but also all other processes and the Windows OS on the machine. Even machine administrators are not able to see the memory of the enclave. The below screenshot shows what an admin would get to see when browsing the enclave memory using a debugger (note the question marks, as opposed to the actual memory content).

The compliance regime is shifting toward preventing high-privilege users (DBAs, sysadmins, etc.) from accidentally or maliciously exposing sensitive information, so it makes sense that this is the primary security push.  I think that these changes are starting to make Always Encrypted a better option than a roll-your-own data encryption model.

Chicago Parking Ticket Data Set

Kevin Feasel

2018-09-26

Data

Bob Pusateri shows us a new data set to mess with:

A few weeks ago I came across this blog post by Matt Chapman. Matt filed FOIA requests with the City of Chicago and, after multiple attempts, was able to get access to over 36 million parking tickets written between 2003 and 2016. Matt goes on to explain Chicago’s parking ticket database, how he processed the data, analyzed it, and in one location got Chicago to put up additional “No Parking” signs to reduce parking tickets in that spot by 50%. That is most definitely using analytics for a great cause!

But let’s get back to that data for a second, that’s what really interests me. Matt shared his raw data for others to analyze, but it was formatted as a PostgreSQL dump. Now PostgreSQL is a great tool with an even greater price, but it’s not always the easiest to use. After spinning up a Linux VM and spending hours setting everything up as best I could, I still couldn’t get the dump to restore properly. Apparently I didn’t have all the exact versions of certain extensions installed, and because of that the tables couldn’t be loaded. Grrrr.

Bob has our backs, though, and has a properly-formatting, normalized parking ticket data set that weighs in at about 500MB.

Running SQL Server 2019 In Docker

Andrew Pruski walks us through setting up SQL Server 2019 CTP 2 on Linux with Docker for Windows:

If you’ve been anywhere near social media this week you may have seen that Microsoft has announced SQL Server 2019.

I love it when a new version of SQL is released. There’s always a whole new bunch of features (and improvements to existing ones) that I want to check out. What I’m not too keen on however is installing a preview version of SQL Server on my local machine. It’s not going to be there permanently and I don’t want the hassle of having to uninstall it.

This is where containers come into their own. We can run a copy of SQL Server without it touching our local machine.

Click through for the step-by-step.

SQL Server 2019 Containers Available

The SQL Server team has a getting started post on pulling down the latest CTP in a container, as well as some additional container features:

SQL Server 2019 is now available on Red Hat Enterprise Linux as a Red Hat Certified Container Images and Ubuntu-based container images enabling you to take advantage of the latest SQL Server engine innovations such as new SQL Graph features, and Data Discovery and Classification. We are also making it possible to adopt SQL Server in containers with existing scenarios such as Replication and Distributed Transaction which are now part of SQL Server 2019 on Linux.

This makes it easier to get started with SQL Server 2019 without potentially messing up your already-working systems.

Improvements In Table Variable Performance In SQL Server 2019

Matthew McGiffen tries out SQL Server 2019 to test a scenario where table variables were giving poor estimates in prior versions:

One of the most popular posts on my blog last year was where I pretty much suggested that people not use table variables:

Think twice before using table variables

This wasn’t new information when I wrote it, but bad performance due to the use of table variables remained such a common anti-pattern that I thought it was worth stressing again.

So, when I saw the above 2019 feature I thought I’d better investigate and update what I’m telling people.

TL;DR It looks like table variables are no longer a problem.

Read the whole thing.  This has the potential of changing long-standing advice going back a decade regarding table variables.

PFS Corruption When Moving From SQL Server 2014

Paul Randal notes a bug in SQL Server 2014:

I’m seeing reports from a few people of DBCC CHECKDB reporting PFS corruption after an upgrade from SQL Server 2014 to SQL Server 2016 or later. The symptoms are that you run DBCC CHECKDB after the upgrade and get output similar to this:

Msg 8948, Level 16, State 6, Line 5
Database error: Page (3:3863) is marked with the wrong type in PFS page (1:1). PFS status 0x40 expected 0x60.
Msg 8948, Level 16, State 6, Line 5
Database error: Page (3:3864) is marked with the wrong type in PFS page (1:1). PFS status 0x40 expected 0x60.
CHECKDB found 2 allocation errors and 0 consistency errors not associated with any single object.
CHECKDB found 2 allocation errors and 0 consistency errors in database 'MyProdDB'.
repair_allow_data_loss is the minimum repair level for the errors found by DBCC CHECKDB (MyProdDB).

I’ve discussed with the SQL Server team and this is a known bug in SQL Server 2014.

Read on for the fix and additional good advice.

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