Visualizing Stock Data With Lares

Bernando Lares shows off some stuff his lares can do around visualizing time series data:

The overall idea of these functions is to visualize your stocks and portfolio’s performance with a just a few lines of simple code. I’ve created individual functions for each of the calculations and plots, and some other functions that gather all of them into a single list of objects for further use.

On the other hand, the lares package is “my personal library used to automate and speed my everyday work on Analysis and Machine Learning tasks”. I am more than happy to share it with you for your personal use. Feel free to install, use, and comment on any of its code and functionalities and I’ll happy to help you with it. I have previously shared other uses of the library in other posts which might also interest you: Visualizing ML Results (binary)Visualizing ML Results (continuous)and AutoML to understand datasets.

  • NOTE 1: The following post was written by a non-economist or professional investor. I am open to your comments and technical corrections if needed. Glad to learn as always!

  • NOTE 2: I will be using the less customizable functions in this post so we can focus more on the outputs than in the coding part; but once again, feel free to use the functions and dive into the library to understand or change them!

  • NOTE 3: All currency units are USD ($).

It does seem to be easy to use for this scenario.

Basic Linux For The SQL DBA

Kellyn Pot’Vin-Gorman continues her series on getting SQL Server DBAs ramped up on Linux:

Let’s begin with discussing WHY it’s not a good idea to be root on a Linux host unless absolutely necessary to perform a specific task. Ask any DBA for DB Owner or SA privileges, and you will most likely receive an absolute “No” for the response. DBAs need to have the same respect for the host their database runs on. Windows hosts have significantly hardened user security by introducing enhancements and unique application users to enforce similar standards at the enterprise server level, and Linux has always been this way. To be perfectly blunt, the Docker image with SQL Server running as root is a choice that shows lacking investigation to what privileges are REQUIRED to run, manage and support an enterprise database. This is not how we’d want to implement it for customer use.

Unlike a Windows OS, the Linux kernel is exposed to the OS layer. There isn’t a registry that requires a reboot or has a safety mechanism to refuse deletion or write to files secured by the registry or library files. Linux ASSUMED if you are root or if you have permissions to a file/directory, you KNOW what you’re doing. Due to this, it’s even more important to have the least amount of privileges to perform any task required.

Proper deployment would have a unique MSSQL Linux login owning the SQL Server installation and a DBAGroup as the group vs. the current configuration of ROOT:ROOT owning everything. With all the enhancements to security, this is one area that as DBAs, we should request to have adhered to. Our databases should run as a unique user owning the bin files and database processes.

Much of this post is walking us through some basics of security, but it also includes helpful built-in commands unrelated to security, like df to view free disk space.

Troubleshooting KSQL

Robin Moffatt walks us through a few scenarios where KSQL queries aren’t returning any data:

Probably the most common question in the Confluent Community Slack group’s #ksql channel is:

Why isn’t my KSQL query returning data?

That is, you’ve run a CREATE STREAM, but when you go to query it…

ksql> SELECT * FROM MY_FIRST_KSQL_STREAM;

…nothing happens. And because KSQL queries are continuous, your KSQL session appears to “hang.” That’s because KSQL is continuing to wait for any new messages to show you. So if your run a KSQL SELECT and get no results back, what could be the reasons for that?

Robin gives us five reasons why this might be.

Learn Extended Events With This Workbench

Phil Factor gives us a great walkthrough of Extended Events:

A lot of the information about the way that SQL Server is working that can only be provided by Extended Events (XEvents). It is such a versatile system that it can provide a lot more than would otherwise require SQL Trace. If done well, Extended Events are so economical to use that it takes very little CPU. For many tasks, it requires less effort on the part of the user than SQL Trace.

Extended Events (XEvents) aren’t particularly easy to use, and nothing that involves having to use XML is likely to be intuitive: In fact, many DBAs compare XML unfavourably in terms of its friendliness with a cornered rat. SSMS’s user-interface for Extended Events, thankfully, removes a lot of the bite. For the beginner to XEvents with a background in SQL, it is probably best to collect a few useful ‘recipes’ and grow from that point. Templates and snippets are invaluable.

Phil’s workbenches (especially those written with Robyn Page) are fantastic ways of digging into a topic of interest.

Integrating Power Query And Microsoft Flow

Chris Webb shows us how to take data from SQL Server and send it via Power Query through Microsoft Flow to create a CSV:

The Power Query/Flow integration is still in Preview and I found a few things didn’t work reliably: for example the first few times I ran my Flow I got errors saying that it couldn’t connect to the Azure SQL Database, even though it clearly could while I was designing the query, but that error went away after a while. What’s more it only works for SQL Server data sources right now and I really hope that it is enabled for all the other data sources that Power Query can connect to, especially Excel. These are just teething troubles though, and it’s clear that this is going to be revolutionary for Power Query and Flow users alike!

Click through for an example.

Reminder: Cycle Those SQL Server Error Logs

Monica Rathbun has a public service announcement:

I saw this again recently and see it too often in environments so wanted to take a second to remind everyone to cycle their error logs on a regular basis. SQL Server keeps error logs and when you reboot or restart SQL Server services the logs are cycled and a new one is created. Depending on how many logs you have configured for SQL Server to have this may include removal of the oldest log as well. Since many of pride ourselves on keeping our SQL Servers up and running, reboots may be few and far between thus our logs get large in size.

When they grow out of control it can require long wait times for the logs open to even view them. An easy way to keep this from happening is to cycle them routinely. You can easily automate these by creating a SQL Agent job to cycle the log to a new one on a regular basis whether it is monthly, weekly or even daily.

My preference is to cycle daily with 45 or so logs maintained; that way, if there are service restarts, I still have more than a month of logs.

What’s New With Machine Learning Services

Niels Berglund looks at SQL Server 2019’s Machine Learning Services offering for updates:

So, when I read What’s new in SQL Server 2019, I came across a lot of interesting “stuff”, but one thing that stood out was Java language programmability extensions. In essence, it allows us to execute Java code in SQL Server by using a pre-built Java language extension! The way it works is as with R and Python; the code executes outside of the SQL Server engine, and you use sp_execute_external_script as the entry-point.

I haven’t had time to execute any Java code as of yet, but in the coming days, I definitely will drill into this. Something I noticed is that the architecture for SQL Server Machine Learning Services has changed (or had additions to it).

That Java support is for Spark, I’d imagine.  And I hope they allow for Scala.

Rayshader: 3D Surface Plotting In R

David Smith looks at an interesting package in R:

Tyler describes the rayshader package in a gorgeous blog post: his goal was to generate 3-D representations of landscape data that “looked like a paper weight”. (Incidentally, you can use this package to produce actual paper weights with 3-D printing.) To this end, he went beyond simply visualizing a 3-D surface in rgl and added a rectangular “base” to the surface as well as shadows cast by the geographic features. He also added support for detecting (or specifying) a water level: useful for representing lakes or oceans (like the map of the Monterey submarine canyon shown below) and for visualizing the effect of changing water levels like this animation of draining Lake Mead.

It looks great.

Apache Pulsar Now A Top-Level Project

Kevin Feasel

2018-09-27

Hadoop

George Leopold reports on Apache Pulsar:

Apache Pulsar is touted as a highly scalable, low-latency messaging platform running on commodity hardware. Besides Yahoo (NASDAQ: AABA), current enterprise users include Zhaopin Ltd., the Chinese online recruitment service. Zhaopin said Apache Pulsar addresses “the shortcomings of existing messaging systems, such as message durability, low latency.”

Other early enterprise users said they are using the messaging system as a bridge between public and private clouds as they roll out hybrid cloud strategies. Other early uses include stream processing and analysis of industrial Internet of Things sensor data. Most emerging use cases seek to move beyond slow batch processing, Pulsar supporters said.

Now that it’s a top-level Apache project, it’ll be interesting to see if it eats away at Kafka’s market share.

SOS_WORK_DISPATCHER

Joe Obbish digs into a new wait type in SQL Server 2019:

Upon upgrading to SQL Server 2019 CTP2, you may see the new SOS_WORK_DISPATCHER wait type at the top of the list:

The above screenshot is server level wait stats from my four core desktop after SQL Server was running for a few hours. SQL Server wasn’t really doing much since start up, so it felt unlikely that this wait was a sign of a problem. However, I was curious about what this wait type meant and wanted to know more.

Click through for Joe’s findings and what you should do with this wait type.

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