Other Ignite Announcements

Kevin Feasel

2018-09-25

Cloud

Denny Cherry gives us a quick roundup of Ignite announcements:

On the Azure Data Platform side of the world, we have the announcement that Azure SQL DB now supports databases up to 100 TB in size using the Hyperscale feature of Azure SQL DB which you’ll see coming on October 1st, 2018.  Hyperscale is an excellent move for customers, as many customers were blocked by the fact that they couldn’t move the database to Azure SQL DB simple because of size; and this limit is going away in just a few short days.

Along with the legacy database platform, we have Managed Instance which was in Public Preview.  The fact is that it is in preview is no-more; Managed Instance is being released in General Availability starting on October 1st, 2018.  Managed Instance will make migrations to Azure much more accessible for many clients that need support for a SQL Server instance because of features that aren’t available in Azure SQL DB. Managed Instance will bridge this gap for customers giving customers basically full SQL Server functionality within a PaaS service.

In the Azure SQL DB space, we see new features for optimization of query performance getting released to General Availability.  These features include three new features called row mode: memory grant feedback, approximate query processing, and table variable deferred compilation. With minimal effort, these features can collectively optimize your memory usage and improve overall query performance.

They’re throwing a lot of stuff our way, including a less expensive version of Azure SQL Data Warehouse.

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