Investigating Azure Data Explorer

James Serra digs into how you can use Azure Data Explorer:

Azure Data Explorer (ADX) was announced as generally available on Feb 7th.  In short, ADX is a fully managed data analytics service for near real-time analysis on large volumes of data streaming (i.e. log and telemetry data) from such sources as applications, websites, or IoT devices.  ADX makes it simple to ingest this data and enables you to perform complex ad-hoc queries on the data in seconds – ADX has speeds of up to 200MB/sec per node (currently up to 3 nodes) and queries across a billion records take less than a second.  A typical use case is when you are generating terabytes of data from which you need to understand quickly what that data is telling you, as opposed to a traditional database that takes longer to get value out of the data because of the effort to collect the data and place it in the database before you can start to explore it.

It’s a tool for speculative analysis of your data, one that can inform the code you build, optimizing what you query for or helping build new models that can become part of your machine learning platform.  It can not only work on numbers but also does full-text search on semi-structured or un-structured data.  One of my favorite demo’s was watching a query over 6 trillion log records, counting the number of critical errors by doing a full-text search for the word ‘alert’ in the event text that took just 2.7 seconds.  Because of this speed, ADX can be a replacement for search and log analytics engines such as elasticsearch or Splunk.  One way I heard it described that I liked was to think of it as an optimized cache on top of a data lake.

Click through for James’s explanation and where you might want to use ADX.

Building a VPC with AWS

Priyaj Kumar takes us through the process of building a Virtual Private Cloud in AWS:

AWS provides a lot of services, these services are sufficient to run your architecture. The backbone for the security of this architecture is VPC (Virtual Private Cloud). VPC is basically a private cloud in the AWS environment that helps you to use all the services by AWS in your defined private space. You have control over the virtual network and you can also restrict the incoming traffic using security groups.

Overall, VPC helps you to secure your environment and give you a complete authority of incoming traffic. There are two types of VPCs, Default VPC that is by default created by Amazon and Non-Default VPC that is created by you to suffice your security needs.

Now that you have an idea of how VPC works, I will take you through the different services offered by Amazon VPC.

Read on to see how to set one up.

Securely Accessing External Resources From Databricks AWS

Itai Weiss shows how you can securely hit external data sources when using Databricks for AWS:

For security purposes, Databricks Apache Spark clusters are deployed in an isolated VPC dedicated to Databricks within the customer’s account. In order to run their data workloads, there is a need to have secure connectivity between the Databricks Spark Clusters and the above data sources.

It is straightforward for Databricks clusters located within the Databricks VPC to access data from AWS S3 which is not a VPC specific service. However, we need a different solution to access data from sources deployed in other VPCs such as AWS Redshift, RDS databases, streaming data from Kinesis or Kafka. This blog will walk you through some of the options you have available to access data from these sources securely and their cost considerations for deployments on AWS. In order to establish a secure connection to these data sources, we will have to configure the Databricks VPC with either one of the following two available options :

Read on for those two options.

Forcing Job Order In Azure DevOps

Chris Taylor shows us how to set up job dependencies in Azure DevOps:

When I first started with VSTS and ultimately Azure DevOps, I went through many failed builds because the order of the jobs in your pipeline don’t run in the order that you’ve built them and how you would logically believe them to run. The image below shows two Build Pipeline jobs but when the build is queued, whether this be manual or via CI, the second job is running before job #1. In this example the build will fail because Job #2 is to deploy a dacpac to a SQL Server on Linux Docker Container (Using Ubuntu Agent Host) but obviously this cannot be done until the dacpac has been created in Job #1 which is running on a VS2017 Agent Host:

Click through to see how it’s done.

Working with Hive in HDInsight

Brad Llewellyn takes us through building an HDInsight cluster and writing Hive queries against it:

Hive is a “SQL on Hadoop” technology that combines the scalable processing framework of the ecosystem with the coding simplicity of SQL.  Hive is very useful for performant batch processing on relational data, as it leverages all of the skills that most organizations already possess.  Hive LLAP (Low Latency Analytical Processing or Live Long and Process) is an extension of Hive that is designed to handle low latency queries over massive amounts of EXTERNAL data.  One of this coolest things about the Hadoop SQL ecosystem is that the technologies allow us to create SQL tables directly on top of structured and semi-structured data without having to import it into a proprietary format.  That’s exactly what we’re going to do in this post.  You can read more about Hive here and here and Hive LLAP here.

We understand that SQL queries don’t typically constitute traditional data science functionality.  However, the Hadoop ecosystem has a number of unique and interesting data science features that we can explore.  Hive happens to be one of the best starting points on that journey.

Click through for the screenshot-laden demonstration.

Querying Cosmos DB From SQL Server

Jovan Popovic shows how you can use the Cosmos DB ODBC driver to perform OPENROWSET queries against Cosmos DB:

Now you need to install ODBC Driver for CosmosDB on the computer where you have SQL Server installed. I’m using Microsoft Azure Cosmos DB ODBC 64-bit.msi for 64-bit Windows – 64-bit versions of Windows 8.1 or later, Windows 8, Windows 7, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows Server 2012, and Windows Server 2008 R2.

Once you install this driver, you should setup ODBC source in system DSN and test the connection:

If you’re running SQL Server 2019, you can follow Jovan’s first two steps and then create an external data source and table with PolyBase to get to the same results.

Azure Blob Storage and Data Lake Storage Gen2

Melissa Coates shows what you need to know about Azure Blob Storage with Azure Data Lake Storage Gen2:

– You may need to consider separate storage accounts if you need to segregate access control (RBAC), virtual networks, access keys, and the like. (Note that RBAC can also be set at the container level too, but ACL type permissions only apply to ADLS Gen2 and not to blob storage.)
– If you don’t need the hierarchical namespace whatsoever (for non-analytical use cases), this could mean a separate storage account. The storage cost is the same but transaction costs are higher when the HNS is enabled (discussed in item #8 of this post).

Click through for more details, including several more tips about Azure Storage Accounts, Azure Blob Storage Containers, and the Azure Storage Blobs themselves.

Passing Messages to Azure Service Bus via Data Factory

Rayis Imayev shows how we can use Logic Apps to let Azure Data Factory send messages to Azure Service Bus:

Summary:
1) Azure Data Factory and Service Bus can find common grounds to communicate with each other, and Azure Logic Apps could serve as a good mediator to establish this type of messaging communication.
2) As soon as messages land in a service bus queue, it’s now a responsibility of recipient side to obtain and process those message, which may be part of another blog post.

Click through for a demo of the process.

Deleting in Azure Data Factory

Meagan Longoria is happy that Azure Data Factory v2 now has a Delete activity:

It is a common practice to load data to blob storage or data lake storage before loading to a database, especially if your data is coming from outside of Azure. We often create a staging area in our data lakes to hold data until it has been loaded to its next destination. Then we delete the data in the staging area once our subsequent load is successful. But before February 2019, there was no Delete activity. We had to write an Azure Function or use a Logic App called by a Web Activity in order to delete a file. I imagine every person who started working with Data Factory had to go and look this up.

But now Data Factory V2 has a Delete activity.

Meagan shows how it works, what kinds of parameters you can set, and a couple of gotchas, so check it out.

Querying CosmosDB with PolyBase

Hasan Savran shows how you can query CosmosDB with T-SQL statements:

SQL Server Polybase Services lets us to pull data from other data resources by using T-SQL queries. SQL Server 2019 introduces new connectors for Polybase services like Oracle, Teradata and MongoDB. In one of the SQL Server 2019 presentations from Bob Ward, I saw the CosmosDB logo when he was talking about the new connectors of SQL Server 2019. CosmosDB already has an ODBC driver and you can use it as a datasource for your Power BI, SSIS or SSMS. SQL Server 2019 makes this connection easier by using the Polybase services.
      
      In this post, I am going to show you how to configure SQL Server 2019 Polybase to connect Azure CosmosDB Mongo databases

I have a bit of a vested interest in this, so it is heartening to see people trying out PolyBase. It’s more heartening when they use it after they try it out.

Categories

March 2019
MTWTFSS
« Feb  
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031