Feeding IoT Data into Delta Lake

Saeed Barghi shows how you can stream sensor data from Azure IoT Hub into Databricks Delta Lake:

IoT devices produce a lot of data very fast. Capturing data from all those devices, which could be at millions, and managing them is the very first step in building a successful and effective IoT platform.

Like any other data solution, an IoT data platform could be built on-premise or on cloud. I’m a huge fan of cloud based solutions specially PaaS offerings. After doing a little bit of research I decided to go with Azure since it has the most comprehensive and easy to use set of service offerings when it comes to IoT and they are reasonably priced. In this post, I am going to show how to build the architecture displayed in the diagram below: connect your devices to Azure IoT Hub and then ingest records into Databricks Delta Lake as they stream in using Spark Streaming.

Click through for the instructions.

Chaos Engineering and KubeInvaders

Andrew Pruski wants to play a game:

KubeInvaders allows you to play Space Invaders in order to kill pods in Kubernetes and watch new pods be created (this actually might be my favourite github repo of all time).

I demo SQL Server running in Kubernetes a lot so really wanted to get this working in my Azure Kubernetes Service cluster. Here’s how you get this up and running.

I got to see Andrew show it off at SQL Saturday Cork and it was as fun as you’d expect.

Querying Essbase from Power BI

Kellyn Pot’vin-Gorman shows how to query data from an Oracle Essbase cube in the Oracle Applications Cloud from Power BI:

The OAC environment that Opal gave me access possessed an example schema/data based on an Audio-Video store revenue for multiple years. 

I’d never worked with the OAC before, but I was quickly able to find five methods to connect Power BI to it, either to import or to direct connect to the data:

1. Data Direct makes a Rest API to connect to the Oracle Cloud.
2. Use the web interface with Power BI and “scrape the website”, allowing PBI to build the table from example.
3. Connect with an ODBC driver
4. Via the OAC interface, export to Excel and then import into Power BI
5. Via the OAC interface, export to a table and then import into Power BI as a CSV file.

So, uh, yeah, you can do it. At least five ways.

Handling Spatial Data in Cosmos DB

Hasan Savran gives us some tips on storing spatial data in Cosmos DB:

Importing Spatial Data into CosmosDB can be a challenge. CosmosDB is not a relational database and you may need to change your data model structure to add spatial data. You cannot create a new container for spatial data and plan to join this container to your other containers. There are free tools which might help with GeoJson conversion, but you may still need to add converted geoJson data into your data models. Spatial data becomes very powerful when you find a way to join it with your application’s data.

    In the following example, I am going to download the hurricanes from NOAA website. Data is in CSV format so we may need to transform data to create a good data model for CosmosDB. I downloaded the all hurricane data for 2005 which was the year of Katrina hurricane. First thing I did, was to change the name of columns and make them more user-friendly. I have used the following names for columns. Here is a sample row from the CSV file.

Click through for the example.

Executing Azure SSIS Packages from Blob Storage

Andy Leonard cranks it to the next level:

I confess: I have been waiting for this feature since I first learned of Azure-SSIS.

When I first saw Azure-SSIS – which creates an Azure Data Factory Integration Runtime and SSIS Catalog in the cloud, my first thought was a paraphrase Ferris Bueller’s question about dying the river green: “If we can execute SSIS packages from the SSIS Catalog in Azure Data Factory, why can’t we execute SSIS packages from Azure Blob Storage?” Today, we can.

Read on to see how you can do it.

Building a Big Data Cluster

Mohammad Darab continues a series on SQL Server Big Data Clusters in Azure Kubernetes Service:

To kick off the Big Data Cluster “Default configuration” creation, we will execute the following Powershell command:

mssqlctl cluster create

That will first prompt us to accept the license terms. Type y and Enter. 

Mohammad takes us through the default installation, which requires only a few parameters before it can go on its merry way.

Using the Cosmos DB Data Migration Tool

Kevin Feasel

2019-06-25

Cloud

Hasan Savran shows how you can use the Cosmos DB Data Migration Tool to move data from various sources into Cosmos DB:

All you need is the connection string of your database or location of your source files and your CosmosDB keys. If you are using a database as source, you can format the data model pretty easy. You might have issues if the source you use does not have a JSON data type. JSON Array might look like string in CosmosDB because of data type mapping problems.

I am going to use CSV file as source in the following example. You can’t define a column as JSON array in excel. I have the following two columns in my CSV file. If I import these values into CosmosDB as they are, I see coordinates field’s data type will turn into a text field in CosmosDB. You can go back and try to update them in CosmosDB but that will be an expensive solution.

The one downside to this tool is that it doesn’t work with collections defined using the Mongo API.

Creating an Azure Databricks Cluster

Brad Llewellyn shows how you can create an Azure Databricks cluster:

There are three major concepts for us to understand about Azure Databricks, Clusters, Code and Data.  We will dig into each of these in due time.  For this post, we’re going to talk about Clusters.  Clusters are where the work is done.  Clusters themselves do not store any code or data.  Instead, they operate the physical resources that are used to perform the computations.  So, it’s possible (and even advised) to develop code against small development clusters, then leverage the same code against larger production-grade clusters for deployment.  Let’s start by creating a small cluster.

Read on for an example.

Databricks Runtime 5.4

Todd Greenstein announces Databricks Runtime 5.4:

We’ve partnered with the Data Services team at Amazon to bring the Glue Catalog to Databricks.   Databricks Runtime can now use Glue as a drop-in replacement for the Hive metastore. This provides several immediate benefits:
– Simplifies manageability by using the same glue catalog across multiple Databricks workspaces.
– Simplifies integrated security by using IAM Role Passthrough for metadata in Glue.
– Provides easier access to metadata across the Amazon stack and access to data catalogued in Glue.

There are some interesting changes in here.

Building an AKS Cluster

Mohammad Darab continues a series on Big Data Clusters by creating a Kubernetes pod in Azure Kubernetes Service:

Next, we will create a resource group by executing the following command:
az group create –name nameOfMyresourceGroup –location eastus2

Once you execute the above command, you can go into the Azure portal and refresh your resource group pane and see the newly created resource group.

Once that is setup, it’s time to create the actual Kubernetes cluster.

Click through for the full set of instructions.

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