Using rquery To Speed Up Data Manipulations

Kevin Feasel

2018-01-12

R

John Mount shows off some rquery benchmarks versus dplyr and data.table:

Let’s take a look at rquery’s new “ad hoc” mode (made convenient through wrapr‘s new “wrapr_applicable” feature). This is where rquery works on in-memory data.frame data by sending it to a database, processing on the database, and then pulling the data back. We concede this is a strange way to process data, and not rquery’s primary purpose (the primary purpose being generation of safe high performance SQL for big data engines such as Spark and PostgreSQL). However, our experiments show that it is in fact a competitive technique.

We’ve summarized the results of several experiments (experiment details here) in the following graph (graphing code here). The benchmark task was hand implementing logistic regression scoring. This is an example query we have been using for some time.

There are some nice early results, so it’ll be interesting to watch as this develops.

Tidytext 0.1.6

Kevin Feasel

2018-01-12

R

Julia Silge announces a new version of tidytext:

I am pleased to announce that tidytext 0.1.6 is now on CRAN!

Most of this release, as well as the 0.1.5 release which I did not blog about, was for maintenance, updates to align with API changes from tidytext’s dependencies, and bugs. I just spent a good chunk of effort getting tidytext to pass R CMD check on older versions of R despite the fact that some of the packages in tidytext’s Suggests require recent versions of R. FUN TIMES. I was glad to get it working, though, because I know that we have users, some teaching on university campuses, etc, who are constrained to older versions of R in various environments.

There are some more interesting updates. For example, did you know about the new-ish stopwords package? This package provides access to stopword lists from multiple sources in multiple languages. If you would like to access these in a list data structure, go to the original package. But if you like your text tidy, I GOT YOU.

Read on for examples and grab the latest version.

Visual Principles

I have a post looking at three visual principles important to creating good dashboards:

In European languages, we read from left to right and from top to bottom.  In Middle Eastern languages like Hebrew and Arabic, we read from right to left and top to bottom.  In ancient Asian languages (particularly Chinese), we read from top to bottom and right to left, but in modern Chinese, we read left to right and top to bottom.  As far as Japanese goes, we read every which way because YOLO.  The way we read biases the way we look at things.

There has been quite a bit of research done on looking at where we look on a screen or on a page. I’m going to describe a few layouts, but focusing on research done on Europeans.  If you poll a group of Israeli or Saudi Arabian readers, flip the results.

Read the whole thing.  The second part of that comes out soon.

T-SQL Tuesday Roundup

Arun Sirpal has the T-SQL Tuesday roundup for January 2018:

Thank you to everyone that took the time to write and contribute, I enjoyed reading about how you conquered your challenges, here is a round-up in no particular order.

There is, as always, plenty of reading available.

Welcome, CXCONSUMER

Erik Darling points out that CXCONSUMER is now a wait type in SQL Server:

According to Pedro’s slide, but not the ENTIRELY MISSING DOCUMENTATION, this wait is the “safe” type of parallelism wait.

It’s a good thing Pedro is a dutiful blogger, so we don’t have to pull our hair out while unfurling these mysteries.

Speaking of documentation, our new CXCONSUMER friend isn’t mentioned in Query Store Wait Stats, either.

This is a very useful addition.

Performance Testing Post-Updates

Joe Chang has some quick and dirty performance tests from SQL Server 2016 SP1 compared to SQL Server 2106 SP1 CU7 (the first post-Meltdown/Spectre release):

linear sum, SQL Server 2016 sp1 cu 7 bld 4466 and OS patches vs sp1 base
9% faster, 12% more CPU efficiently
individual queries range from 24% faster to 0.3% slower.
there probably is a penalty in the recent fixes, but fixes since SP1 also made improvements?

Click through for more details.  We’ll have to see a lot more testing to know, but that’s certainly not awful.

Incrementing Matches In Powershell Regex

Tom Rayner has an example of building multiple regex matches in Powershell:

In the PowerShell Slack, I recently answered a question along these lines. Say you have a string that reads “first thing {} second thing {}” and you want to get to “first thing {0} second thing {1}” so that you can use the -f  operator to insert values into those spots. For instance…

The question is: how can you replace the {}’s in the string to {<current number>}?

Read on for more details.

Categories

January 2018
MTWTFSS
« Dec Feb »
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031