Restoring A Database To A Different Location

Mike Fal shows how to restore a database to a different location using Powershell:

The cmdlet is straightforward in its use. Fundamentally, all we need to declare is an instance, database name, and backup file. However, if we don’t declare anything else, the cmdlet will try and restore the database files to their original locations. Keep in mind this is no different than how a normal RESTORE DATABASE command works.

This is where we make our lives easier with PowerShell. First off, to move files using Restore-SqlDatabase, we need to create a collection of RelocateFile objects. Don’t let the .Net-ness of this freak you out. All we’re doing is creating something that has the logical file name and the new physical file name. In other words, it’s just an abstraction of the MOVE statement in RESTORE DATABASE.

Read the whole thing.

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