Virtual Function Calls

Ewald Cress is thinking about virtual function calls:

A virtual function call, on the other hand, is only resolved at runtime. The compiler literally does not know what address is going to get called, and neither does the runtime except in the heat of the moment, because that is going to depend on the type of the object instance that the function is called on. Bear with me, I’ll try and simplify.

A C++ object is just a little chunk of memory: a bunch of related instance variables if you like. All objects of the same class have the same structure in this regard. If you’re wondering about functions (a.k.a. methods), these belong to the class, or put differently, to ALL objects of that class. Once compiled, each method is a chunk of memory with a known address, containing the compiled instructions.

From there, it’s a harrowing journey through bigger layers of indirection.

Spark 2.1

Reynold Xin announces Apache Spark 2.1:

  • Structured Streaming

    Introduced in Spark 2.0, Structured Streaming is a high-level API for building continuous applications. The main goal is to make it easier to build end-to-end streaming applications, which integrate with storage, serving systems, and batch jobs in a consistent and fault-tolerant way.

    • Event-time watermarks: This change lets applications hint to the system when events are considered “too late” and allows the system to bound internal state tracking late events.

    • Support for all file-based formats and all file-based features: With these improvements, Structured Streaming can read and write all file-based formats, e.g. JSON, text, Avro, CSV. In addition, all file-based features—e.g. partitioned files and bucketing—are supported on all formats.

    • Apache Kafka 0.10: This adds native support for Kafka 0.10, including manual assignment of starting offsets and rate limiting.

This is a pretty hefty release.  Click through to read the whole thing.

Ten Notes On SparkR

Kevin Feasel

2017-01-03

R, Spark

Neil Dewar has a notebook with ten important things when migrating from R to SparkR:

  1. Apache Spark Building Blocks. A high-level overview of Spark describes what is available for the R user.

  2. SparkContext, SQLContext, and SparkSession. In Spark 1.x, SparkContext and SQLContext let you access Spark. In Spark 2.x, SparkSession becomes the primary method.

  3. A DataFrame or a data.frame? Spark’s distributed DataFrame is different from R’s local data.frame. Knowing the differences lets you avoid simple mistakes.

  4. Distributed Processing 101. Understanding the mechanics of Big Data processing helps you write efficient code—and not blow up your cluster’s master node.

  5. Function Masking. Like all R libraries, SparkR masks some functions.

  6. Specifying Rows. With Big Data and Spark, you generally select rows in DataFrames differently than in local R data.frames.

  7. Sampling. Sample data in the right way, and use it as a tool for converting between big and small data.

  8. Machine Learning. SparkR has a growing library of distributed ML algorithms.

  9. Visualization.It can be hard to visualize big data, but there are tricks and tools which help.

  10. Understanding Error Messages. For R users, Spark error messages can be daunting. Knowing how to parse them helps you find the relevant parts.

I highly recommend checking out the notebook.

Non-Trusted Foreign Keys

Daniel Janik explains what happens when you don’t have trusted foreign key constraints:

Why is it untrusted? Perhaps we disabled the check to load data and neglected to re-enable it?

No matter what the reason is the next part is not as simple. This is for two reasons.

  1. The data in the child table may not be valid. Since the key was not being checked I may have data in my table that isn’t represented in the parent.

  2. The syntax is a bit silly. As Mike Byrd in Austin, TX says, Microsoft studders. The syntax to reenable is “CHECK CHECK”. Let’s look at how we reenable the Address key check.

Read on for pros and cons of disabling (or not trusting) foreign key constraints.

Tracking Applications

Andy Levy explains how to use connection strings to track which application is hogging database resources:

Fortunately, the .NET SqlClient (and other ODBC drivers as well) has a built-in solution. Your application’s connection string has quite a few parameters available to provide configuration and information, and one that seems to get overlooked is Application Name. This one does exactly what it says on the tin – it lets you specify a name that will be displayed to anyone looking for it in SQL Server, including sp_whoisactive. Anyplace you have the ability to write a connection string, you can use this. It costs you nothing!

You can also start getting fancy with resource governor as well, segmenting pools based on application name.

Where Azure Analysis Services Fits

Melissa Coates explains where Azure Analysis Services fits in common BI architectures:

(2) Data Sources

  • From a single source such as a data warehouse. This is the most traditional path for BI development, and still has a very valid place in many BI/analytics deployments. This scenario puts the work of data integration on the ETL process into the data warehouse, which is the most appropriate place.

  • Directly from various systems.  This can be done, but works well only in specific cases – it definitely won’t work well if there are a lot of highly normalized tables, or if there’s not a straightforward way to relate the disparate data together. Trying to go directly to the source systems & skip an intermediary data warehouse puts the “integration” burden on the data source view in Analysis Services, so plan for plenty of time testing if you’re going to try this route (i.e., it can be much harder, not easier). Note that this option only makes sense if the data is stored in Analysis Services because it needs to be related together somehow (i.e., DirectQuery mode, discussed next in #3, with > 1 data source won’t work if a user tries to combine data sources because the data is not inherently related).

If you’re thinking about Azure Analysis Services, this post is a good one.

Testing Transactional Replication

Jes Borland wraps up her series on transactional replication from an on-prem Availability Group to Azure SQL Database:

Congratulations, you’ve configured a remote distributor, configured all of your AG replicas as publishers, and configured your SQL Database as a subscriber! Now you want to ensure that transactions are replicating to the database, and that they continue to do so if there is a failover in the AG.

Read on for the two testing scenarios.

Columnstore Elimination

Sunil Agarwal has a two-part series on columnstore data elimination.  First up is column elimination:

Now, let us run the same query on the table with clustered columnstore index as shown in the picture below. Note, that the logical IOs for the LOB data is reduced by 3/4th for the second query as only one column needs to be fetched. You may wonder why LOB? Well, the data in each column is compressed and then is stored as BLOB. Another point to note is that the query with columnstore index runs much faster, 25x for the first query and 4x for the second query.

Next up is rowgroup elimination:

In the context of rowgroup elimination, let us revisit the previous example with sales data

  • You may not even need partitioning to filter the rows for the current quarter as rows are inserted in the SalesDate order allowing SQL Server to pick the rowgroups that contain the rows for the requested date range.
  • If you need to filter the data for a specific region within a quarter, you can partition the columnstore index at quarterly boundary and then load the data into each partition after sorting on the region. If the incoming data is not sorted on region, you can follow the steps (a) switch out the partition into a staging table T1 (b) drop the clustered columnstore index (CCI) on the T1 and create clustered btree index on T1 on column ‘region’ to order the data (c) now create the CCI while dropping the existing clustered index. A general recommendation is to create CCI with DOP=1 to keep the prefect ordering.

From these two articles, queries which hit a small percentage of columns and stick to a relatively small number of rowgroups will likely perform better.  For people who understand normal B-tree indexes, the second point seems clear enough, but the first point is at least as important.

Automatic Soft-NUMA In SQL Server

Robert Davis wants to find information on soft-NUMA in his SQL Server instance:

So having read up on automatic soft-NUMA, I was eager to see what it did with my main production servers when I upgraded them. My main pair of production servers (they are paired into an Availability Group) have 4 NUMA nodes with 16 physical cores per node and hyperthreading for a total of 32 logical cores per node with 1.5 TB of RAM. Obviously, we are using core-based Enterprise Edition for these servers. I thought I knew what automatic soft-NUMA would do, and wanted to confirm if my expectations were right.

Read on, but it looks like there’s a “to be continued…” here.

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