Virtual Function Calls

Ewald Cress is thinking about virtual function calls:

A virtual function call, on the other hand, is only resolved at runtime. The compiler literally does not know what address is going to get called, and neither does the runtime except in the heat of the moment, because that is going to depend on the type of the object instance that the function is called on. Bear with me, I’ll try and simplify.

A C++ object is just a little chunk of memory: a bunch of related instance variables if you like. All objects of the same class have the same structure in this regard. If you’re wondering about functions (a.k.a. methods), these belong to the class, or put differently, to ALL objects of that class. Once compiled, each method is a chunk of memory with a known address, containing the compiled instructions.

From there, it’s a harrowing journey through bigger layers of indirection.

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