Finding Transactions After A Crash

Paul Randal has a procedure which will find rolled-back transactions after a crash:

Then we can search in the transaction log, using the fn_dblog function, for LOP_BEGIN_XACT log records from before the crash point that have a matching LOP_ABORT_XACT log record after the crash point, and with the same transaction ID. This is easy because for LOP_BEGIN_XACT log records, there’s a Begin Time column, and for LOP_ABORT_XACT log records (and, incidentally, for LOP_COMMIT_XACT log records), there’s an End Time column in the TVF output.

And there’s a trick you need to use: to get the fn_dblog function to read log records from before the log clears (by the checkpoints that crash recovery does, in the simple recovery model, or by log backups, in other recovery models), you need to enable trace flag 2537. Now, if do all this too long after crash recovery runs, the log may have overwritten itself and so you won’t be able to get the info you need, but if you’re taking log backups, you could restore a copy of the database to the point just after crash recovery has finished, and then do the investigation.

Read on for the code, as well as a test.

Lead Blockers

Kenneth Fisher talks about fullbacks:

Blocking is just part of life I’m afraid. Because we have locks (and yes we have to have them, and no, NOLOCK doesn’t avoid them) we will have blocking. Typically it’s going to be very brief and you won’t even notice it. But sometimes you get a query or two blocked for long enough to cause a problem. Even more rarely you end up with a long chain of blocked sessions. Session 100, 101, and 102 are blocked by 67 which is blocked by 82, which is blocked by … Well, you get the idea. It can be very difficult to scan through all of those blocked sessions to find the root cause. That one or two session(s) that are actually causing the problem. So to that end I’ve written the following query. Among other things it will return any lead blockers, how many sessions are actually being blocked by it, and the total amount of time those sessions have been waiting. It will also give you the last piece of code run by the that particular session. Although be aware that won’t always tell you exactly what code caused the blocking.

Click through for the script.

Restoring An Encrypted Master Database

Dave Mason clarifies how to restore the master database to a new instance when the master database backup is encrypted:

This strikes me as an odd chicken-and-egg problem. I’d need to create the certificate to decrypt the [master] backup on the instance I’m restoring [master] to…and the certificate is stored in [master], which I’d be overwriting. As weird as it sounds, this is exactly what needs to happen. Maybe it’s not as complicated as it sounds.

Read on for the solution.  You might also want to check out that one time he met Larry Bird.

In-House Power BI

Paul Turley reports that the bits to publish a Power BI report to SSRS are in the latest vNext preview:

“Power BI reports in SQL Server Reporting Services: January 2017 Technical Preview now available”  This feature addition will allow Power BI reports to be published to a local SQL Server Reporting Services server, entirely-on-premises without using the Power BI cloud service.

The January 2017 Technical Preview can be downloaded from: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=54610

Reza Rad shows us installation and deployment:

We are in a world that rapidly running towards cloud. Your files are in Dropbox, or OneDrive these days, Your photos uploaded to a cloud storage, your emails are all backed up in a cloud backup media, and I’m in this thinking that in next few years, we might eat our food from a cloud kitchen! However there are still businesses and companies who require some on-premises solutions, and as long as a requirement exists, there should be an answer for it. Power BI for On-Premises bring the power of self-service, interactive reports of Power BI to these businesses. Power BI for On-premises is a great big step towards utilizing better data insight in all environments.

This will probably help more companies than you might think—Power BI is really useful as a reporting tool, but it can be hard getting sign-off to go to Azure.

Perfmon Counters Of Interest

Allen White shares his list of interesting perfmon counters:

Paging File(_Total)\% Usage

When Windows runs out of memory it takes large chunks of memory and swaps it out to disk, to the Paging File. Unfortunately, the slowest operation in all computing is writing to disk, regardless of the physical media involved, so swapping memory to disk is naturally going to slow down the performance of your system. Keeping an eye on this counter will help you know when you are encountering memory issues, and you can then take action to resolve the conflicts.

There are dozens of interesting counters you could use, but I appreciate that Allen stuck with 15.

Modern Data Warehouse Dictionary

Melissa Coates has put together a glossary of terms for modern data warehousing:

Logical Data Warehouse

A logical data warehouse (LDW) builds upon the traditional DW by providing unified data access to multiple platforms. Conceptually, the logical data warehouse is a view layer that abstractly accesses distributed systems such as relational DBs, NoSQL DBs, data lakes, in-memory data structures, and so forth, consolidating and relating the data in a virtual layer. This availability of data on various platforms adds flexibility to a traditional DW, and speeds up data availability. The tradeoff for this flexibility can be slower performance for user queries, though the full-fledged LDW vendors employ an array of optimization techniques to mitigate performance issues. A logical data warehouse is broader than just data virtualization and distributed processing which can be thought of as enabling technologies. According to Gartner a full-fledged LDW system also involves metadata management, repository management, taxonomy/ontology resolution, auditing & performance services, as well as service level agreement management.

If you’re just getting started with the topic, check this out, as it will probably clear up several concepts.

T-SQL Tuesday Roundup, Bugs Edition

Brent Ozar rounds up T-SQL Tuesday 86:

I dunno about you, but I got a big stocking full of coal. Next year, I’m gonna be better, and I plan on asking Santa for a whole bunch of Connect requests. For T-SQL Tuesday, I asked you to name your favorite SQL Server bugs & enhancement requests, and here’s what you want in your stocking next year.

If you agree with a feature, click on it, and upvote its Connect request. These bloggers took the time to make their case – now it’s time for you to vote.

29 separate links, so there’s a lot of reading here.

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