Tracking Applications

Andy Levy explains how to use connection strings to track which application is hogging database resources:

Fortunately, the .NET SqlClient (and other ODBC drivers as well) has a built-in solution. Your application’s connection string has quite a few parameters available to provide configuration and information, and one that seems to get overlooked is Application Name. This one does exactly what it says on the tin – it lets you specify a name that will be displayed to anyone looking for it in SQL Server, including sp_whoisactive. Anyplace you have the ability to write a connection string, you can use this. It costs you nothing!

You can also start getting fancy with resource governor as well, segmenting pools based on application name.

Related Posts

Database Migration With dbatools

Jess Pomfret shows how easy it is to migrate databases from one SQL Server instance to another using dbatools: Now that there are no connections we can move the database.  Depending on the situation it might be worth setting the database to read only or single user mode first. In my case, I had the […]

Read More

Working With Azure SQL Managed Instances

Jovan Popovic has a couple of posts covering configuration for Azure SQL Managed Instances.  First, he looks at how to configure tempdb: One limitation in the current public preview is that tempdb don’t preserves custom settings after fail-over happens. If you add new files to tempdb or change file size, these settings will not be preserved after fail-over, and […]

Read More


January 2017
« Dec Feb »