Watch Those Powershell Shell Versions

Emin Atac reviews a couple of 64- versus 32-bit Powershell oddities:

    • Context

My colleagues send an message with a link that points to a script located on a shared drive to help our users reinstall their software.
Our users just click on the link in their Outlook and got a message saying:
\\servername.fqdn\share\softwarename\install.ps1 cannot be loaded because running scripts is disabled on this system. For more information, see about_Execution_Policies at https:/go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=135170.

    • Issue

Users use Outlook that is a 32-bit process. If they click on link that points to a script, it will spawn a 32-bit console and run a 32-bit powershell.exe child process.
It appears that the ExecutionPolicy isn’t defined in the 32-bit PowerShell and set to its default value: “Restricted” although it’s defined in the 64-bit Powershell.

Read on for the solution to this issue as well as a second, similar issue.

Simplified Disaster Recovery With dbatools

Chrissy LeMaire shows how you can make DR a lot easier with dbatools:

When we talk about Disaster Recovery or DR, it’s often coupled with the term High Availability or HA. Here are some definitions from my graduate course on HADR.

high availability

  • Deals with minor outages, and failover solutions are automated
  • The goal is to restore full system functionality in a short time

disaster recovery

  • Deals with major outages such as natural and man-made disasters
  • Focuses on manual processes and procedures to restore systems back to their original state
  • Characterized by a phased approach to restoring the primary site

In the context of SQL Server, HA would be Availability Groups (AG), Failover Clustering (FCI), Log Shipping and more. I won’t be addressing High Availability in this post, however.

Chrissy has a demo of everything in action, including running a series of tests to ensure that your DR site actually has everything.

Testing AG Read-Only Routing

Jess Pomfret shows us how we can use dbatools to test Availability Group read-only routing:

The other part I needed to set up was read-only routing, this enables SQL Server to reroute those read only connections to the appropriate replica.  You can also list the read only replicas by priority if you have multiple available or you can group them to enable load-balancing.

Although this seems to be setup correctly so that connections that specify their application intent of read only will be routed to the secondary node I wanted to prove it.

Read on to see how Jess is able to prove it.

New dbatools Release

Chrissy LeMaire announces new changes to dbatools:

Marching onward to dbatools 1.0, a ton of commands have been renamed to align with our now mature naming scheme. These changes were made in today’s release, version 0.9.410 aka regularlegs, now available on GitHub and the PowerShell Gallery.

Here’s the general idea:

  • DbaDatabase has mostly been renamed to DbaDb with a couple exceptions

  • DbaSql has been changed to just Dba, no exceptions. Think of Dba as “Sql”.

  • DbaConfig has been renamed to DbatoolsConfig

  • TempDbConfiguration has been renamed to TempdbConfig

  • All Configuration commands are Config except SpConfigure

  • DbaDacpac has been renamed to DbaDacPackage. Dac is the prefix for our data-tier application commands.

  • DbaDbQueryStoreOptions has been renamed to DbaDbQueryStoreOption

Some of this is in preparation for breaking changes in dbatools 1.0.  There’s a lot of stuff in this release, so check it out.

Important Community Tools

Chrissy LeMaire shares some great community-driven Powershell modules:

dbops

dbops was created by Kirill Kravtsov.

dbops is a Powershell module that provides Continuous Integration/Continuous Deployment capabilities for SQL database deployments.

It is based on DbUp, which is DbUp is an open source .NET library that helps you to deploy changes to SQL Server databases. dbops currently supports both SQL Server and Oracle.

Read on for links to several more projects.

Confirmation In Powershell

Shane O’Neill shows off how easy it is to add confirmation checkpoints into Powershell code:

Finally it works… BUT…

  • It’s 26 lines long for this piece of code. If we have multiple then this is going to blow up size wise, and
  • There’s definitely more but I think I’ve gotten the point across (or I hope I have).

So let’s try and use what’s built in to PowerShell.

The built-in version is 3 lines of code and provides more functionality.  You probably want to use that version; click through to see this all in action.

Creating Timelines With dbatools

Marcin Gminski shows how to pull SQL Agent and backup history out of SQL Server and display it as a visual history timeline:

Currently, the output from the following commands is supported:

  • Get-DbaAgentJobHistory
  • Get-DbaBackupHistory

You will run the above commands as you would normally do but pipe the output to ConvertTo-DbaTimeline, the same way as you would with any other ConverTo-* PowerShell function. The output is a string that most of the time you will save as file using the Out-File command in order to open it in a browser.

Then, with the ConvertTo-DbaTimeline cmdlet, you can convert that into an HTML page which looks pretty good.

Deploying To Power BI Report Server Using Powershell

Rob Sewell shows us how to automate Power BI Report Server deployments:

But I dont want to have to do this each time and there will be multiple pbix files, so I wanted to automate the solution. The end result was a VSTS or TFS release process so that I could simply drop the pbix into a git repository, commit my changes, sync them and have the system deploy them automatically.

As with all good ideas, I started with a google and found this post by Bill Anton which gave me a good start ( I could not get the connection string change to work in my test environment but this was not required so I didnt really examine why)

I wrote a function that I can use via TFS or VSTS by embedding it in a PowerShell script.

Click through for the script.

Default Parameter Values In Powershell

Chrissy LeMaire explains what $PSDefaultParameterValues is and places where she finds it useful:

$PSDefaultParameterValues is a hashtable available in PowerShell that can set defaults for any command that you run. In it’s simplest form, setting a default parameter value can look like this:

After running the above code, Get-DbaDatabase will show verbose output every time it’s executed, without me having to specify -Verbose. If I need to override that verbose flag for some reason, I can simply add -Verbose:$false to my Get-DbaDatabase command.

Read on for plenty of good use cases and additional resources from sharp people.

Power BI Administration With Powershell

Adam Saxton shares a video covering what is available in the MicrosoftPowerBIMgmt Powershell module:

The Power BI PowerShell and the Admin API allow you to quickly inventory your organization and manage workspaces and access. Forget the hastle of setting up the App registration within Azure Active Directory for API access, the Power BI PowerShell cmdlets take care of it for you. Just install and start using today!

Click through for that video.

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September 2018
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