dbatools 1.0 Forthcoming

Chrissy LeMaire announces that dbatools will be out on June 19th by my count:

We’ve got about 30 issues left to resolve which you can see and follow on our GitHub Projects page. If you’ve ever been interested in helping, now is the perfect time as we only have 30 more days left to reach our goal.

If you’re a current or past dbatools developer, we’d love any help we can get. Just hit up the GitHub Projects page to see what issues are left to resolve. If someone is already assigned, please reach out to them on Slack in the #dbatools-dev channel and see if they can use your help.

Read the whole thing and see if there’s anything you can do to help.

Multi-Line Powershell Comments

Jess Pomfret shows how you can build out Powershell comments with multiple lines of code in them:

You can see above the first example looks good, however in the second example the first two lines should both have a prompt to show they are code. I spent a little while Googling this without much avail. I then figured, somewhere within dbatools there must be an example with two lines of code. Sure enough I found my answer, and it’s pretty straightforward.

Click through for the answer, as well as one of the most important Powershell cmdlets you’ll ever find on the Internet.

Unioning Sets with Powershell

Shane O’Neill gives us a rundown of unions in Powershell:

For me, it summed down to “Is there something like UNION or UNION ALL in PowerShell?

Luckily, this is something that I had asked before and been told the answer. So here I am, repeating the answer for you all since this is how I learn; repetition and practice.

Read on to see what Shane comes up with.

Extracting ISPAC Files From the SSIS Catalog

Aaron Nelson shows how we can use Powershell to export ISPAC files from the SSIS catalog:

You’ll notice with the code below, that we’re able to extract that Project-object into a variable named $Proj, but when we pipe that to the Get-Member cmdlet we do not see a method called Export.

Read on to learn what the name of this mysterious method actually is and how you can make use of it.

Using Powershell Core in Containers

Anthony Nocentino shows us how we can run Powershell Core in containers:

Now, with that last technique, we’ve encapsulated the entire lifecycle of the execution of that script into one line of code. It’s like this script execution never happened…or did it 😉 All kidding aside, we effectively have a serverless computing platform now. Using this technique in our data centers, we can spin up a container, on any version of PowerShell on any platform, run some workload/script and when the workload finishes, the container just goes away. For this to work well, we will need something to drive that process. In an upcoming blog post, we’ll talk more about how we can automate the running of PowerShell containers in Kubernetes.
 
In this post, we covered a lot, we looked at how you can interactively run PowerShell Core in a container, how you can pass cmdlets into a container at runtime, running different versions of PowerShell Core and also how you can persistently store scripts outside of containers in volumes and run those scripts in your containers. We also looked at how you can encapsulate the whole execution of a script and the containers life cycle into one line of code. Really giving you the ability to run PowerShell Core anywhere on any platform.

Check it out for sure. Containers today are where VMs were about a decade ago: becoming more common but still a bit “out there” for administrators. It’s not a stretch to say that within a few years, containers will be as ubiquitous as VMs were by 2012, if not more so.

Deploying SSIS Packages with Powershell

Aaron Nelson shows us how we can deploy an Integration Services ISPAC into the SSIS catalog with Powershell:

In my last post, I showed how you can use the SSIS PowerShell Provider to execute an SSIS package with PowerShell.  Of course, in order to execute that SSIS package, it has to get deployed first.  In Part 5 of Andy Leonard’s “SSIS, Docker, and Windows Containers” series he used some PowerShell code from Matt Masson’s blog post to deploy an .ISPAC file to the SSIS catalog.

Click through for the code.

Azure Cloud Shell

Mark Broadbent gives us an introduction to Azure Cloud Shell:

There are two ways to access Azure Cloud Shell, the first being directly through the Azure Portal itself. Once authenticated, look to the top right of the Portal and you should see a grouping of icons and in particular, one that looks very much like a DOS prompt (have no fear, DOS is nowhere to be seen).

The second method to access Azure Cloud Shell is by jumping directly to it via shell.azure.com which will require you to authenticate to your subscription before launching. There is an ever so slight difference between each method. Accessing the Shell via the Azure Portal will not require you to specify your Azure directory context (assuming you have several) since your Portal will have already defaulted to one, whereas with the direct URL method that obviously doesn’t happen.

Read the whole thing.

Azure SQL Linux VM Configuration with dbatools

Rob Sewell walks us through configuring SQL Server on an Azure VM running Linux, installing Powershell, and using dbatools:

I had set the Network security rules to accept connections only from my static IP using variables in the Build Pipeline. I use MobaXterm as my SSH client. Its a free download. I click on sessions

There wasn’t much I could excerpt here, but this is a heavily screenshot-driven tutorial.

Using dbatools for Inventory Analysis

Andreas Schubert gives us a way to learn more about our SQL Server inventories with dbatools:

With the multitude of environments that I am operating, it’s impossible to remember every server, every database or the multiple different ways they are interacting with each other. Therefore, one of the first things I do when taking over a consulting engagement is mapping out all those different bits of information.

Since the environments usually change pretty fast, my goal is to automate this process as much as possible.

In this series of posts, I will try to show you how I am implementing this. Of course, your requirements or implementations may differ, but hopefully this blog post can give you some ideas about your tasks too.

Click through for a script. There are also some good comments.

Failing Pester Tests Can Still Show Green

Shane O’Neill walks us through an oopsie moment:

In modifying the template, I forgot to take out the original It block and just put my It block inside it.

This lead to my block “pass by deafult” failed 
(as it should cause of that typo) but the original, parent block it was in “does something useful” passed!

Click through for a demo and explanation.

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May 2019
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