Visual Studio Code

Rob Sewell shows how to run SQL Server queries using Visual Studio Code:

Reading this blog post by Shawn Melton Introduction of Visual Studio Code for DBAs reminded me that whilst I use Visual Studio Code (which I shall refer to as Code form here on) for writing PowerShell and Markdown and love how easily it interacts with Githuib I hadn’t tried T-SQL. If you are new to Code (or if you are not) go and read Shawns blog post but here are the steps I took to running T-SQL code using Code

I played around with an early version of this and my thought was that there were some nice improvements over Management Studio (like being able to filter and sort the result set grid without going back to the server), but that there are still too many nice things Management Studio does for me to take a serious look at it.  Still, I’m hopeful that Microsoft moves in the direction of having a fully-featured querying tool for Linux so I can finally join the perpetual Year of the Linux Desktop.

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