Press "Enter" to skip to content

Category: Hadoop

Hadoop For .NET Developers

Elton Stoneman has a new Pluralsight course out:

My latest Pluralsight course is out now:

Hadoop for .NET Developers

It takes you through running Hadoop on Windows and using .NET to write MapReduce queries – proving that you can do Big Data on the Microsoft stack.

The course has five modules, starting with the architecture of Hadoop and working through a proof-of-concept approach, evaluating different options for running Hadoop and integrating it with .NET.

I’ve liked Elton’s courses, as he’s one of the few trainers who really takes the time to show how you can integrate .NET languages into a Hadoop ecosystem; the general philosophy is “go learn Java and Scala and Python and …”

Comments closed

Self-Paced HDInsight Training

Ashish Thapliyal introduces three EdX courses on HDInsight:

Implementing Real-Time Analysis with Hadoop in Azure HDInsight

Start course

In this four week course, you’ll learn how to implement low-latency and streaming Big Data solutions using Hadoop technologies like HBase, Storm, and Spark on Microsoft Azure HDInsight.

Course Syllabus

Use HBase to implement low-latency NoSQL data stores.
Use Storm to implement real-time streaming analytics solutions.
Use Spark for high-performance interactive data analysis.

These are free courses on EdX.  I personally wouldn’t bother getting the certificate, but hey, it’s your money.

Comments closed

Hortonworks HDP 2.5 Available

Hortonworks has a new version of their data platform, 2.5:

We are very pleased to announce that the Hortonworks Data Platform (HDP) Version 2.5 is now generally available for download. As part of a Open and Connected Data Platforms offering from Hortonworks, HDP 2.5 brings a variety of enhancements across all elements of the platform spanning data science, data access to security to governance.

At Hadoop Summit 2016 San Jose on 06/28/2016, we unveiled the latest innovation package within Hortonworks Data Platform 2.5.

The top points of interest:  Spark 2, Kafka 0.10.0, Ambari 2.4, and Storm 1.0.1.  These are four big projects with major improvements.  Looks like I’ve got something to do this weekend…

Comments closed

Spark Usage Scenarios

Rimma Nehme has several usage scenarios for Spark on Azure:

For data scientists, we provide out-of-the-box integration with Jupyter (iPython), the most popular open source notebook in the world. Unlike other managed Spark offerings that might require you to install your own notebooks, we worked with the Jupyter OSS community to enhance the kernel to allow Spark execution through a REST endpoint.

We co-led “Project Livy” with Cloudera and other organizations to create an open source Apache licensed REST web service that makes Spark a more robust back-end for running interactive notebooks.  As a result, Jupyter notebooks are now accessible within HDInsight out-of-the-box. In this scenario, we can use all of the services in Azure mentioned above with Spark with a full notebook experience to author compelling narratives and create data science collaborative spaces. Jupyter is a multi-lingual REPL on steroids. Jupyter notebook provides a collection of tools for scientific computing using powerful interactive shells that combine code execution with the creation of a live computational document. These notebook files can contain arbitrary text, mathematical formulas, input code, results, graphics, videos and any other kind of media that a modern web browser is capable of displaying. So, whether you’re absolutely new to R or Python or SQL or do some serious parallel/technical computing, the Jupyter Notebook in Azure is a great choice.

If you could only learn one new thing in 2016, Spark probably should be that thing.  Also, I probably should agitate a bit more about wanting Spark support within Polybase…

Comments closed

Ambari Metrics Collector Error

Jon Morisi had to troubleshoot an issue with the Ambari metrics collector not starting:

Last week I had a bit of a trial by fire:
“Here’s a 7 node, Hortonworks Hadoop cluster, metrics is broken, fix it, go!”

The initial indication that metrics was broken was apparent in the Services tab for Ambari Metrics.  Here it showed that there was an error and that Metrics Collector was Stopped.  The error however wasn’t very informative:

Connection failed: [Errno 111] Connection refused…

That didn’t tell me much at all, and neither did googling.
(I hope the title of this blog helps someone else find this solution quicker.)

Jon includes the answer and some additional helpful details.  Check it out.

Comments closed

Hive Data Ingestion In AWS

Songzhi Liu shows how to use the AWS stack to move data into Hive:

S3 bucket
In this framework, S3 is the start point and the place where data is landed and stored. You will configure the S3 bucket notifications as the event source that triggers the Lambda function. When a new object is stored/copied/uploaded in the specified S3 bucket, S3 sends out a notification to the Lambda function with the key information.

Lambda function
Lambda is a serverless technology that lets you run code without a server. The Lambda function is triggered by S3 as new data lands and then adds new partitions to Hive tables. It parses the S3 object key using the configuration settings in the DynamoDB tables.

DynamoDB table
DynamoDB is a NoSQL database (key-value store) service. It’s designed for use cases requiring low latency responses, as it provides double-digit millisecond level response at scale. DynamoDB is also a great place for metadata storage, given its schemaless design and low cost when high throughput is not required. In this framework, DynamoDB stores the schema configuration, table configuration, and failed actions for reruns.

EMR cluster
EMR is the managed Hadoop cluster service. In the framework, you use Hive installed on an EMR cluster.

This is a detailed post, but well worth a read if you’re on AWS.

Comments closed

RDBMS To Hive Via Kafka

Rajesh Nadipalli shows how to use Kafka to read relational database data and feed it to Hive:

Processes that publish messages to a Kafka topic are called “producers.” “Topics” are feeds of messages in categories that Kafka maintains. The transactions from RDBMS will be converted to Kafka topics. For this example, let’s consider a database for a sales team from which transactions are published as Kafka topics. The following steps are required to set up the Kafka producer

I’d call this a non-trivial but still straightforward exercise.  Step 1 from the SQL Server side could be reading from transaction logs (which would be the least-intrusive), but you could also set up something like change tracking and fire off messages when important tables’ records change.

Comments closed

Data Access And Streaming

Kartik Paramasivam discusses data access problems and solutions within a streaming architecture:

Using a remote store: This is the traditional model for building applications. Here, when an application needs to process an event, it makes a remote call to a separate SQL or No-SQL database. In this model, write operations are always remote calls, but reads can be performed on a local cache in certain scenarios. There are a large number of applications at LinkedIn that fall into this category.

Another pattern is to use a remote cache (e.g., Couchbase) that is fronting a remote database (e.g., Oracle). If the remote cache is used primarily for reading adjunct data, then applications use an Oracle change capture stream (using Databus) to populate the remote cache.

This is a must-read if you’re looking at implementing a streaming architecture and need to do any kind of data enrichment.

Comments closed

Reprocessing Kafka Stream Data

Matthias J Sax shows how to reprocess input data using Kafka Streams:

In this blog post we describe how to tell a Kafka Streams application to reprocess its input data from scratch. This is actually a very common situation when you are implementing stream processing applications in practice, and it might be required for a number of reasons, including but not limited to: during development and testing, when addressing bugs in production, when doing A/B testing of algorithms and campaigns, when giving demos to customers or internal stakeholders, and so on.

The quick answer is you can do this either manually (cumbersome and error-prone) or you can use the new application reset tool for Kafka Streams, which is an easy-to-use solution for the problem. The application reset tool is available starting with upcoming Confluent Platform 3.0.1 and Apache Kafka 0.10.0.1.

In the first part of this post we explain how to use the new application reset tool. In the second part we discuss what is required for a proper (manual) reset of a Kafka Streams application. This parts includes a deep dive into relevant Kafka Streams internals, namely internal topics, operator state, and offset commits. As you will see, these details make manually resetting an application a bit complex, hence the motivation to create an easy to use application reset tool.

Being able to reprocess streams is a critical part of the Kappa architecture, and this article is a nice overview of how to do that if you’re using Kafka Streams.

Comments closed

Hadoop: DAS Or NAS?

Jagdish Mirani asks whether you should prefer Direct Attached Storage (DAS) or Network Attached Storage (NAS) for your Hadoop cluster:

If you want to spin up an Apache Hadoop cluster, you need to grapple with the question of how to attach your disks. Historically, this decision has favored direct attached storage (DAS). This approach is in keeping with the fundamental Hadoop principle of moving processing to a where the data lives, thereby taking advantage of disk locality to optimize performance. Disk locality is so core to Hadoop that virtually any description of Hadoop starts with this.

The alternative is to use network attached storage (NAS). In contrast to DAS, NAS separates the compute and storage layers so that storage can be shared across a number of servers by shipping data over the network. Historically, this heavy dependence on the network made NAS an order of magnitude slower. Remember, the state of the art was 1GbE networks, and switches were slower and more expensive. I/O requirements for demanding Hadoop-based applications could only be met by DAS.

This is a very interesting discussion.  In my limited experience, I’ve had trouble selling operations teams on DAS, given the increased ops effort required to keep a bunch of attached disks going.  Hat tip Ari Amster.

Comments closed