Getting Started with Azure Databricks

Brad Llewellyn has a tutorial for Azure Databricks:

Databricks is a managed Spark framework, similar to what we saw with HDInsight in the previous post.  The major difference between the two technologies is that HDInsight is more of a managed provisioning service for Hadoop, while Databricks is more like a managed Spark platform.  In other words, HDInsight is a good choice if we need the ability to manage the cluster ourselves, but don’t want to deal with provisioning, while Databricks is a good choice when we simply want to have a Spark environment for running our code with little need for maintenance or management.

Azure Databricks is not a Microsoft product.  It is owned and managed by the company Databricks and available in Azure and AWS.  However, Databricks is a “first party offering” in Azure.  This means that Microsoft offers the same level of support, functionality and integration as it would with any of its own products.  You can read more about Azure Databricks herehereand here.

Click through for a demonstration of the product.

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