Reviewing the Stack Overflow Developer Survey

Michael Toth looks at the recently-released 2019 Stack Overflow Developer Survey:

Since 2011, Stack Overflow has been surveying their users each year to answer questions about the technologies they use, their work experience, their compensation, and their satisfaction at work. Given Stack Overflow’s place in the broader programming world, they are able to draw quite the audience for their annual surveys.

This year, nearly 90,000 developers participated in the survey! There’s a lot in this survey, and I recommend reviewing it yourself, but I wanted to surface some of the key findings that I thought were particularly relevant to data professionals here.

Stack Overflow says they will be releasing the underlying data for this survey in the coming weeks, so I hope to return to this for a deeper analysis once that’s made available. For now, let’s get into the results!

Michael’s lede involves R versus Python in terms of salaries, but for me, the top line is that functional programmers make more money. Clojure, F#, Scala, Elixir, and Erlang make the top 10 on the global list, including positions 1, 2, 4, and 5. Within the US, Scala, Clojure, Erlang, Kotlin, F#, and Elixir make the top 10, including positions 1, 2, and 4. H/T R-Bloggers

Techniques For Standardizing Raw Scores

Sebastian Sauer shows a few techniques you can use to translate raw scores into standardized scores in R:

A common undertaking in applied research settings such as in some areas of psychology is to convert a raw score into some type of standardized score such as z-scores.

This post shows a way how to accomplish that.

Read on for three techniques.

Understanding DNS for Developers

RJ Zaworski explains DNS for web developers:

DNS can use a similar TCP/IP stack, but being parts of a simple system, most DNS operations can also travel the wire on the Internet’s favorite Roulette wheel: the User Datagram Protocol, UDP.

On a good day, UDP is fast, simple, and stripped bare of unnecessary niceties like delivery guarantees and congestion management. But a UDP message may also never be delivered, or it may be delivered twice. It may never get a response, which makes for fun client design–particularly coming from the relatively safe and well-adjusted world of HTTP. With TCP, you get an established connection and all kinds of accommodations when Things Inevitably Go Wrong. UDP? “Best effort” delivery. Which means a packet thrown over the fence with a prayer for a soft landing.

It’s a good read if you’re new to DNS.

Automating Command Line Sessions with Powershell

James Livingston shows us how to redirect the standard in flow with .NET, using Powershell as the example language:

Command Line Interface (CLI) tools can be very useful for interacting with certain applications. However, some CLIs do not let a user pass in parameters which makes it difficult to automate. Instead, they lock a user into an interactive session and force the user to enter commands. Fortunately, some programming languages allow for a redirection of the standard input, output, and error of an running process. A developer co-worker of mine has been very successful doing this in Java, which got me thinking… And turns out, using the .NET libraries, we can implement this functionality for any CLI in PowerShell.

Automating interactions with CLI programs is often not ideal but when you’re stuck, it does the trick.

Micro Modules in Powershell

Kevin Marquette shows how to create a micro module and explains why you might want one:

A micro module is very small in scope and often has a single function. Building a micro module is about getting back to the basics and keeping everything as simple as possible.

There is a lot of good advice out there on how to build a module. That guidance is there to assist you as your module grows in size. If we know that our module will not grow and we will not add any functions, we can take a different approach even though it may not conform fully to the community best practices.

There are a few things which differ from standard module best practices.

Error Messages Related to Temporal Tables

Mala Mahadevan digs into temporal tables:

Last month I was fortunate to have my first ever article published on Simple-Talk, among the best quality website for sql server articles ever. During the process of writing this article I ran into several errors related to temporal tables that I have not seen before. Some of these are documented by Microsoft, some are fairly obvious to understand and others are not. Below I summarize the list of errors you can possibly run into if you are using this really cool feature.

Click through for the list.

Defining Downtime Down

Andy Mallon takes us through the notion of downtime:

There’s a lot of discussion about preventing downtime. As a DBA and IT professional, it’s my sworn duty to prevent downtime. I usually describe my job as DBA something along the lines of, “to make sure data is always available to the people and applications that need it, and never available to the people and applications that shouldn’t have it.” Preventing downtime is certainly important for that first part–but how the heck do you define downtime?

Andy asks more questions than provides answers, but these are the types of questions which the technical side and the business side can get together on to define what constitutes downtime.

Reverting a Git Push

Stuart Moore takes us through backing out a commit in Git when you pushed to the wrong branch:

We’ve all done it. Working for ages tracking down that elusive bug in a project. Diligently committing away on our local repo as we make small changes. We’ve found the convoluted 50 lines of tortured logic, replaced it with 5 simple easy to read lines of code and all the test have passed. So we push it backup to github and wander off to grab some a snack as a reward

Halfway to the snacks you suddenly have a nagging doubt in the back of your mind that you don’t remember starting a new branch before starting on the bug hunt.

Read on for the process.

Trying Out the Data Migration Assistant

Dave Mason shares some thoughts on the Data Migration Assistant:

I recently took advantage of an opportunity to try Mirosoft’s Data Migration Assistant. It was a good experience and I found the tool quite useful. As the documentation tells us, the DMA “helps you upgrade to a modern data platform by detecting compatibility issues that can impact database functionality in your new version of SQL Server or Azure SQL Database. DMA recommends performance and reliability improvements for your target environment and allows you to move your schema, data, and uncontained objects from your source server to your target server.” For my use case, I wanted to assess a SQL 2008 R2 environment with more than a hundred user databases for an on-premises upgrade to SQL 2017.

Dave takes us through an upgrade on three sample databases and then gives us some more messages from actual production databases.

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