The Two-Digit Cutoff For Years

Claudio Silva explains why a two-digit year may be interpreted differently in SQL Server versus Excel:

What do you read when you see some date in a format like “01-Jan-00 00:00:00.000”? Keep in mind that I’m talking about the output directly from the table and without any formatting.
1st of January seems to leave no doubt (just because there is no default date format starting with two digits for the year), but…what about the year part ’00’?
It stands for 1900 and the 3rd column is wrong?
Or it stands for 2000 and the DATEPART function is returning the wrong value?

This is why you want to stick with four-digit years.  But if you’re stuck with two-digit years for some reason, Claudio explains how you can get Excel and SQL Server to return the same results.

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