The Basics Of Bash: Writing Data

Mark Wilkinson hits us with some basic Bash output management:

If you have experience with PowerShell, some properties of Bash variables will feel familiar. In Bash, variables are denoted with a $ just like in PowerShell, but unlike PowerShell the $ is only needed when they are being referenced. When you are assigning a value to a variable, the $ is left off:

#!/bin/bashset -eset -umy_var="World"printf "Hello ${my_var}\n"

Above we assigned a value to my_var without using the $, but when we then referenced it in the printf statement, we had to use a $. We also enclosed the variable name in curly braces. This is not required in all cases, but it is a good idea to get in the habit of using them. In cases where you are using positional parameters above 9 (we’ll talk about this later) or you are using a variable in the middle of a string the braces are required, but there is no harm in adding them every time you use a variable in a string.

The basic syntax is pretty familiar to most programming languages, and there’s nothing scary about outputs, even when Mark starts getting into streams.

Related Posts

Case Classes In Scala

Shubham Dangare explains what case classes are in Scala: Case class is scale way to allow pattern matching on an object without requiring a large amount of boilerplate. All you need to do is add a single case keyword modifier to each class that you want to pattern matching using such modifier makes scala compiler […]

Read More

No Type Equivalence In M

Imke Feldmann notes an oddity in types in Power Query: But this function will not return any matches. I also tried out a (potentially) slower version using Table.SelectColumns(Types, each [Value] = x[Types]) – but still no match.  What I found particularly frustrating here was, that in some cases, these lookups or filters on type-columns worked. […]

Read More

Categories

February 2018
MTWTFSS
« Jan Mar »
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728