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Category: Misc Languages

Dealing with NULLs in Java with SQL Server 2019

Niels Berglund covers changes in SQL Server Machine Learning Services around Java code execution:

In the null values post mentioned above, I mentioned that there are differences between SQL Server and Java in how they handle null. So, when we call into Java from SQL Server, we may want to treat null values the same way as we do in SQL Server.

I wrote about this in the SQL Server 2019 Extensibility Framework & Java – Null Values post mentioned above. However, that post was written before SQL Server 2019 CTP 2.5. In CTP 2.5 Microsoft introduced the Java SDK, and certain things changed. Amongst the things that changed is the way we handle nulls when we receive datasets from SQL Server in our Java code.

Read on to learn how it works today.

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A New Notebook Tool: Polynote

Jeremy Smith, et al, announce a new product:

We are pleased to announce the open-source launch of Polynote: a new, polyglot notebook with first-class Scala support, Apache Spark integration, multi-language interoperability including Scala, Python, and SQL, as-you-type autocomplete, and more.

Polynote provides data scientists and machine learning researchers with a notebook environment that allows them the freedom to seamlessly integrate our JVM-based ML platform — which makes heavy use of Scala — with the Python ecosystem’s popular machine learning and visualization libraries. It has seen substantial adoption among Netflix’s personalization and recommendation teams, and it is now being integrated with the rest of our research platform.

There are some nice pieces to it, especially around language interop.

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Scala Views

Girish Bharti takes us through a performance-tuning technique in Scala:

We all know the power of lazy variables in Scala programming. If you are developing the application with huge data then you must have worked with the Scala collections. Some mostly used collections are List, Seq, Vector, etc. Similarly, you must be aware of the power of Streams. The streams are a very powerful tool for handling the infinite flow of data and streams are powerful because of there lazy transformations. As we know most of the Scala collections are strict so applying an operation on immutable collections creates a new collection. The size of the collection can be huge in the big data world. So, what if you have to apply a lot of transformations to the collection? Is there a way to handle collections in a lazy way? What if you can find a way to apply operations on your usual collections lazily? In this blog, we will be talking about the Scala views and how to use them.

Read the whole thing.

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Registering SignalR to the Cosmos DB Change Feed

Hasan Savran shows us how we can hook up SignalR to view the Cosmos DB Change Feed:

SignalR allows server code to send asynchronous notifications to client-side web applications. By using it, Azure Functions can send real-time messages to your web applications. Prices can get change whenever data changes in database. Notices can be sent if user needs to be notified. Numbers in dashboard can change dynamically when data changes in Cosmos DB. You can do all those with Azure Cosmos DB + Azure Functions and SignalR. This combination works like David Copperfield magic.

There’s a bit of work involved but Hasan shows us how to get it done.

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Paired RDDs in Spark

Ramandeep Kaur explains how Paired Resilient Distributed Datasets (PairRDDs) differ from regular RDDs:

So, assuming that you have a fair idea about what Spark is and the basics of RDDs. Paired RDD is one of the kinds of RDDs. These RDDs contain the key/value pairs of data. Pair RDDs are a useful building block in many programs, as they expose operations that allow you to act on each key in parallel or regroup data across the network. For example, pair RDDs have a reduceByKey() method that can aggregate data separately for each key, and a join() method that can merge two RDDs together by grouping elements with the same key.

When datasets are described in terms of key/value pairs, it is common to want to aggregate statistics across all elements with the same key.

Paired RDDs bring us back to that key-value pair paradigm which Hadoop’s version of MapReduce brought to the forefront.

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Spark for .NET Developers

Ed Elliott has a long-form post covering spark-dotnet:

The .NET driver is made up of two parts, and the first part is a Java JAR file which is loaded by Spark and then runs the .NET application. The second part of the .NET driver runs in the process and acts as a proxy between the .NET code and .NET Java classes (from the JAR file) which then translate the requests into Java requests in the Java VM which hosts Spark.

The .NET driver is added to a .NET program using NuGet and ships both the .NET library as well as two Java jars. One jar is for Spark 2.3 and one for Spark 2.4, and you do need to use the correct one on your installed version of Scala.

As much as I’ve enjoyed his series, getting it in a single-post format is great.

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Parsing Rows Manually with Spark .NET

Ed Elliott shows how we can solve a challenging problem when newlines are in the wrong place:

So the first thing we need to do is to read in the whole file in one chunk, if we just do a standard read the file will get broken into rows based on the newline character:

var file = spark.Read().Option("wholeFile", true).Text(@"C:\git\files\newline-as-data.txt");

This solution is a bit complex. As Ed points out, you’re better off reshaping the file before you try to process it. If it’s a structured file like the example Ed has, a regular expression can do the trick.

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SQL Server CTP 3.2 and Java Extensibility

Niels Berglund walks us through what has changed with Java support in ML Services in SQL Server 2019 CTP 3.2:

One of the announcements of what is new in CTP 3.2 was that SQL Server now includes Azul System’sZulu Embedded right out of the box for all scenarios where we use Java in SQL Server, including Java extensibility.

So, in this post, we look at the impact, (if any), this has to how we use the Java extensibility framework in SQL Server 2019.

This also affects PolyBase.

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ClassNotFoundException and .NET Spark

Ed Elliott takes us through two causes for a ClassNotFoundException when running a Spark job with .NET Spark:

There was a breaking change with version 0.4.0 that changed the name of the class that is used to load the dotnet driver in Apache Spark.

To fix the issue you need to use the new package name which adds an extra dotnet near the end, change:

spark-submit --class org.apache.spark.deploy.DotnetRunner

Click through to see what you should change this line of code to read. If that change doesn’t fix your problem, Ed has a broader solution.

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Adding Aggregates to Table.Profile

Chris Webb shows us how to add additional aggregates to Table.Profile in M:

A few years ago I blogged about the Table.Profile M function and how you could use it to create a table of descriptive statistics for your data:

https://blog.crossjoin.co.uk/2016/01/12/descriptive-statistics-in-power-bim-with-table-profile/

Since that post was written a new, optional second parameter has been added to the function called additionalAggregates which allows you to add your own custom columns containing aggregate values to the output of Table.Profile, so I thought I’d write a follow-up on how to use it.

Click through for that follow-up.

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