File Growth Trace Flags

Jason Brimhall investigates trace flags 1117 and 1118 and how they work in SQL Server 2016 versus older editions:

With the release of SQL Server 2016, these trace flags were rumored to be a thing of the past and hence completely unnecessary. That is partially true. The trace flag is unneeded and SQL 2016 does have some different behaviors, but does that mean you have to do nothing to get the benefits of these Trace Flags as implemented in 2016?

As it turns out, these trace flags no longer do what they did in previous editions. SQL Server now pretty much has it baked into the product. Buuuuut, do you have to do anything slightly different to make it work? This was something I came across while reading this post and wanted to double check everything. After all, I was also under the belief that it was automatically enabled. So let’s create a script that checks these things for me.

Click through for the script and a summary of his findings.

Related Posts

Fun With Undocumented Trace Flags

Joe Obbish has a list of 45 undocumented trace flags: Below is a list of trace flags which, as far as I can tell, have never been publicly documented. I did not fully investigate many of them and many of the descriptions are just guesses. I make no guarantees and none of these should be […]

Read More

Troubleshooting Client Disconnections

Mike Hays looks at a trace flag that can help you troubleshoot why client connections drop: About once a month, I get support ticket regarding SQL Server dropping an application’s or user’s connection.  The problem is SQL Server does not just randomly drop a connection and continue to work normally.  Some force outside the control […]

Read More

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Categories

January 2018
MTWTFSS
« Dec  
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031