Know Your Audience

I continue my series on dashboard visualization:

Before you build a dashboard, you have to know your audience.  If you don’t know who your viewers will be and where their interests lie, you run the risk of building a dashboard which fails to serve their needs.  When that happens, people stop looking at your dashboard.  In order to increase the likelihood that your dashboard will be useful, I have a few critical questions:

  1. Who is your intended audience?
  2. How will your intended audience use your dashboard?
  3. What actions do you want them to take as a result of what they see?
  4. Are you showing the right measures in the right way?
  5. What cultural differences might matter?

The rest of this post will drill into each of these concepts.

These are the types of questions which can make the difference between a dashboard people love and a dashboard people never use.

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