Power BI Dot Plot Custom Visual

Devin Knight continues his Power BI custom visuals series:

In this module you will learn how to use the Dot Plot Custom Visual by MAQ Software.  The Dot Plot is used to show distribution using dots among multiple categories or attributes.

Dot plots are nice because they tend to be informative while keeping the ink to whitespace ratio low.

Quadrant Chart In Power BI

Devin Knight continues his Power BI custom visuals series:

In this module you will learn how to use the Quadrant Chart Custom Visual.  The Quadrant Chart is used to show a distribution of data across separate quadrants.

There’s an interesting mix of 2D layout plus bubble size.  This is probably one of the better custom visuals available.

Limiting Color Usage On Dashboard Charts

Jesse Gorter explains why you shouldn’t overwhelm your dashboard chart users with colors:

In this example we use a signal color for the past too. Do you notice how the usage of green distracts from the current week which is a red? This suggest we are doing great overall even though at this time, we are doing not so great. It is up to you to decide what you want to communicate. If you are a sports team showing the rank during the season, only the current position would be important. In sales, having 30 weeks of outstanding sales above the target and the current week selling slightly under, it would make sense to show the signal color for the past.

Not to mention making it easier for people with CVD to read your report, something with which the red-green scheme does not do great.

The Great Custom Visual Move

Ginger Grant runs into a problem with some of the custom visuals (not) in the Office Store:

This week I decided to do a demo using the Aquarium custom visual.  As readers of my blog know, I have used the custom visual before, but it has been a while and I have changed PCs since then.  No worries I can always go download the visual from the store, right? Wrong. The aquarium visual is not available on the new store. Neither is Image Viewer, if one is looking to add that into your latest Power BI report it is not available. What happened?

Read on to learn why the aquarium is missing.  RIP aquarium (hopefully only temporarily).

Power KPI Custom Visual

Devin Knight continues his Power BI custom visuals series:

In this module you will learn how to use the Power KPI Custom Visual.  The Power KPI displays your KPI indicator values on a helpful multi-line chart with labels.

I like Devin’s example of using this for time series projections versus actuals versus priors.

Maps In Power BI

Reid Havens shows off the different map visuals within Power BI:

ArcGIS Map

The most recent addition to the Power BI Map family. It’s supported by a company called Esri, and is a very feature rich map visual! What makes this visual stand out is that you can overlay whatever data you have with public geographical data such as demographics, weather, and even historical data. It’s highly customizable and offers multiple ways to visualize data with maps, and that’s even before you start adding the public data sets! Can you tell that I like this visual a lot? Because I do! visualize data with maps

Now I could easily spend an entire blog post JUST outlining all the ways to use this visual, but I’ll stick to the highlight reel. It can visualize data with maps using the bubble or fill method similar to the other map visuals, albiet with a few more customizations and tweaks. However, one of the unique features of this visual is the heat map option! Any of you familiar with Power Maps in Excel has probably seen this before…well now we have it in Power BI. I find this data visualization super useful in identifying data clustering based on location.

Read on for additional varieties of maps you can create.  I personally think the bubble map is ugly and that one map with pie charts (thankfully not shown in Reid’s post) is hideous, but there are some very good map visuals available to us.

Drilldown Player Custom Visual

Devin Knight continues his Power BI custom visuals series:

In this module you will learn how to use the Drilldown Player Custom Visual.  The Drilldown Player acts like a slicer that animates other visuals around it on your report.

Click through for the video.  This can be a useful visual for kiosks or demonstrations, as it loops through the different categories.

Plotly And Power BI

Leila Etaati shows how to use Plotly to generate interactive R charts in Power BI:

In the last two posts (Part 1 and 2), I have explained the main process of creating the R custom Visual Packages in Power BI. there are some parts that still need improvement which I will do in next posts. In this post, I am going to show different R charts that can be used in power BI and when we should used them for what type of data, these are Facet jitter chart, Pie chart, Polar Scatter Chart, Multiple Box Plot, and Column Width Chart. I follow the same process I did in Post 1 and Post 2. I just change the R scripts  and will explain how to use these graphs

Leila includes several examples of chart types and shows that it’s pretty easy to get this working.

R’s iGraph + SQL Server Graphs

Dennes Torres has a post which shows how to use R’s iGraph library to visualize graphs created in SQL Server 2017:

The possibility to use both technologies together is very interesting. Using graph objects we can store relationships between elements, for example, relationships between forum members. Using R scripts we can build a cluster graph from the stored graph information, illustrating the relationships in the graph.

The script below creates a database for our example with a subset of the objects used in my article and a few more relationship records between the forum members.

Click through for the script.

Drilldown Choropleth Power BI Custom Visual

Devin Knight has a new entry in his Power BI custom visuals series:

In this module you will learn how to use the Drilldown Choropleth Custom Visual.  The Drilldown Choropleth is a map visual that displays divided regions that are highlighted indicating the relative value in each location.

Click through for Devin’s video and example.

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