Scatterplots For Multivariate Analysis

Neil Saunders declutters a complicated visual with a simple scatterplot:

Sydney’s congestion at ‘tipping point’ blares the headline and to illustrate, an interactive chart with bars for city population densities, points for commute times and of course, dual-axes.

Yuck. OK, I guess it does show that Sydney is one of three cities that are low density, but have comparable average commute times to higher-density cities. But if you’re plotting commute time versus population density…doesn’t a different kind of chart come to mind first? y versus x. C’mon.

Let’s explore.

Simple is typically better, and that adage holds here.

Building Cone Plots In Plotly

The Plotly blog shows how to use Python to build 3D cone plots using Plotly:

This plot uses an explicitly defined vector field. A vector field refers to an assignment of a vector to each point in a subset of space.

In this plot, we visualize a collection of arrows that simply model the wind speed and direction at various levels of the atmosphere.

3-D weather plots can be useful to research scientists to gain a better understanding of the atmospheric profile, such as during the prediction of severe weather events like tornadoes and hurricanes.

Sometimes a 3D plot is the best answer.  When it is, this looks like a good solution.  H/T R-bloggers

Sorting When Your Measure Is Not In The Visual

Kasper de Jonge shows us different ways of sorting a visual by some unrelated measure:

So lets start with the simple one, I want to sort a chart on a measure not part of the visual. Let’s take this visual:

Now instead of sorting by OrderQuantity I want to sort by the ListPrice. The trick here is to make the measure part of the query, and one way you can do that is by adding it to the tooltip

Read on for examples for charts as well as matrices.

Building A Gantt Chart With ggplot2

Sebastian Sauer shows us how to build a gantt chart in R:

Of importance are only TaskPrevious_Evnet and Duration. In addition, we need an overall start date (“2019-03-01” in this case). Each subsequent task is assumed to follow neatly its predecessing event.

Our job is to compute the start date and end date of task given that we know the initial start date and the durations. As said, this procedure is based on the assumption that there is a frictionless and gapless sequence of tasks.

Read on for a code-heavy example.  I’ve always had a soft spot in my heart for gantt charts.

Graphics In R

David Smith is following the kerfuffle that Edward Tufte unleashed on Twitter recently:

While graphics guru Edward Tufte recently claimed that “R coders and users just can’t do words on graphics and typography” and need additonal tools to make graphics that aren’t “clunky”, data journalists at major publications beg to differ. The BBC has been creating graphics “purely in R” for some time, with a typography style matching that of the BBC website. Senior BBC Data Journalist Christine Jeavans offers several examples, including this chart of life expectancy differences between men and women:

I think Tufte’s off base here.

Scatterplot Matrices

The Plotly folks show off scatterplot matrices in Python:

The scatterplot matrix, known acronymically as SPLOM, is a relatively uncommon graphical tool that uses multiple scatterplots to determine the correlation (if any) between a series of variables.

These scatterplots are then organized into a matrix, making it easy to look at all the potential correlations in one place.

SPLOMs, invented by John Hartigan in 1975, allow data aficionados to quickly realize any interesting correlations between parameters in the data set.

In this post, we’ll go over how to make SPLOMs in Plotly with Python. For extra insights, check out our SPLOM tutorial in Python and R.

fff

Why Nobody Is Reading Your Report

Stephanie Evergreen really cuts to the chase:

Here’s the hard truth: Your report probably sucks. Mine sure did. The heart of your content is likely fine, maybe even helpful. But, if you are anything like the hundreds of reports I see every year, the entire set of cultural norms we have somehow developed around reporting is just setting us up for failure, writing a destiny where no one is reading the report.

Why? Let me lay out the most common issues I see and propose some strategic solutions.

There’s an emphasis here on academic papers but it also applies to corporate work too.

Taking Screenshots With R

Abdul Majed Raja shows us how to take screenshots of webpages using R:

webshot package provides one simple function webshot() that takes a webpage url as its first argument and saves it in the given file name that is its second argument. It is important to note that the filename includes the file extensions like ‘.jpg’, ‘.png’, ‘.pdf’ based on which the output file is rendered. Below is the basic structure of how the function goes:

library(webshot)

#webshot(url, filename.extension)
webshot(“https://www.listendata.com/”, “listendata.png”)

If no folder path is specified along with the filename, the file is downloaded in the current working directory which can be checked with getwd().

Now that we understood the basics of the webshot() function, It is time for us to begin with our cases – starting with downloading/converting a webpage as a PDFcopy.

This isn’t something I’d expect to do every day, but I could see it being useful as part of a notebook to give the user a sanity check, like if a webpage or data set has a last updated timestamp that you want to check.  H/T R-Bloggers

WVPlots 1.0.0

John Mount announces WVPlots 1.0.0:

Nina Zumel and I have been working on packaging our favorite graphing techniques in a more reusable way that emphasizes the analysis task at hand over the steps needed to produce a good visualization. We are excited to announce the WVPlots is now at version 1.0.0 on CRAN!

The idea is: we sacrifice some of the flexibility and composability inherent to ggplot2 in R for a menu of prescribed presentation solutions. This is a package to produce plots while you are in the middle of another task.

I like this idea:  I know the kind of plot I need and just want to throw something together for myself to give me an idea of the underlying data.

Power BI Color Palattes

Meagan Longoria helps us choose a color palette for Power BI reports:

A color palette is simply a collection of colors applied to the visual elements in your report. What we typically refer to as color is a combination of three main properties: hue (base color on the color wheel), intensity (brightness or gray-ness) and value (lightness or darkness). You can build an engaging and professional looking report with just 6 colors. It’s possible to have fewer colors or more colors, but 6 should cover many common visualization needs. If you are using more than 6 colors, you might want to check that you are optimizing engagement and cognitive load.

  1. Main color – default color on graphs

  2. Color 2 – used when multiple colors are needed in a graph or report

  3. Color 3 – used when multiple colors are needed in a graph or report and Color 2 has already been used

  4. Highlight color – a color used to highlight important data points to make them stand out from other points on the page

  5. Border color – a light color used for borders on tables and KPIs where necessary

  6. Title color – color used for visual titles and axis labels as appropriate

There’s a lot of good advice in here.

Categories

July 2018
MTWTFSS
« Jun  
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031