More On Machine Learning Services

Ginger Grant continues her Machine Learning Services series with a couple more posts.  First up is on memory allocation:

Enabling Machine Learning Services on SQL Server which I discussed in a previous blog post, requires you to enable external scripts.  Machine Learning Services are run as external processes to SQLPAL. This means that when you are running Python or R code you are running it outside of the managed processes of SQL Server and SQLPAL.  This design means that the resources used to run Machine Learning Services will run outside of the resources allocated for SQL Server.  If you are planning on using Machine Learning Services you will want to review the server memory options which you may have set for SQL Server.  If you have set the max server memory For example, if your server has 16 GB of RAM memory, and you have allocated  8 GB to SQL Server and you estimate that the operating system will use an additional 4 GB, that means that machine learning services will have 4 GB remaining which it can use.

By design, Machine Learning Services will not starve out all of the memory for SQL Server because it doesn’t use it.  This means DBAs to not have to worry about SQL Server processes not running because some R program is using all the memory as it does not use the memory SQL Server has allocated.  You do have to worry about the amount of memory allocated to Machine Learning Services as by default, using our previous example where there was 4 GB which Machine Learning Services can use, it will only use 20% of the available memory or  819 KB of memory.  That  is not a lot of memory.  Most likely if you are doing a lot of Machine Learning Services work you will want to use more memory which means you will want to change the default memory allocation for external services.

Ginger also talks about the Launchpad service:

When calling external processes, internally SQL Server uses User IDs to call the Launchpad service, which is installed as part of Machine Learning Services and must be running for SQL Server to be able to execute code written in R or Python.  The number of users is set by default.  To change the number of users, open  up SQL Server Configuration Manager by typing SQLServerManager14.msc at the run prompt. For some unknowable reason Microsoft decided to hide this application which was previously available by looking at the installed programs on the server.  Now for some reason they think everyone should memorize this obscure command. Once you have the SQL Server Configuration Manager open, right click on the SQL Server Launchpad service and select the properties which will show the window, as shown below.  You will notice I am running an instance called SQLServer2017 which is listed in parenthesis in the window name.

Both are worth reading.

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