Finding Suspect Objects

Kevin Feasel



Wayne Sheffield shows how to find which specific objects are suspect without running a full CHECKDB:

You’d really like to know what tables are affected without having to wait. Luckily(?), this corruption was recorded in msdb.dbo.suspect_pages, and having just recently read Paul Randal’s post here, we know we can use DBCC PAGE to determine this information. And, after having read my prior blog post, you know that we can automate DBCC PAGE, so we can use our new friend “WITH TABLERESULTS” to find out what objects have been corrupted.

The suspect_pages table, documented here, has three particular columns of interest: database_id, file_id and page_id. These correspond nicely to the first three parameters needed for DBCC PAGE. To automate this, we need to know what information we need to return off of the page – and from Paul’s post, we know that this is the field “METADATA: ObjectId”. For this code example, let’s assume that this corruption is on page 11 of the master database (just change “master” to the name of your 2TB database).

Read on for a script, including a script which checks all such suspect pages, and the possibly-better solution as of SQL Server 2012.

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Kevin Feasel



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Amy Herold shows how to find the last known CHECKDB run for each database on a SQL Server instance: Wednesday I walk into the office and immediately hear that CHECKDB is the source of issues on one of the servers and is the reason behind some errors that have been happening. While I don’t think […]

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