Using RTVS

Kevin Feasel



David Eldersveld gives three reasons why you might be interested in R Tools for Visual Studio:

2. Incorporate R projects as part of a broader Visual Studio solution
Many Visual Studio solutions end up being a collection of individual projects. More often than not, these projects are logically joined by virtue of being part of the same business solution, but each one can incorporate different components or languages. For example, you may architect a solution that involves separate projects for loading data­­ with Azure Data Factory, analysis with R, a front-end C# web app, etc. Rather than keep your R code siloed off in a separate solution, unite it with the rest of your code for development and source control.

This is my primary reason.  R Studio is still my go-to option, but RTVS is maturing fairly nicely.  It still feels slower than R Studio when displaying data on-screen (especially when you’re spitting out a couple hundred lines of text), but that Visual Studio integration will go far.  A fourth reason that David does not mention:  it generates the really ugly sp_execute_external_script code for SQL Server R Services.

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