Jupyter On ElasticMapReduce

Tom Zeng shows howt o install Jupyter Notebooks on Amazon’s ElasticMapReduce:

By default (with no --password and --port arguments), Jupyter will run on port 8888 with no password protection; JupyterHub will run on port 8000.  The --port and --jupyterhub-port arguments can be used to override the default ports to avoid conflicts with other applications.

The --r option installs the IRKernel for R. It also installs SparkR and sparklyr for R, so make sure Spark is one of the selected EMR applications to be installed. You’ll need the Spark application if you use the --toree argument.

If you used --jupyterhub, use Linux users to sign in to JupyterHub. (Be sure to create passwords for the Linux users first.)  hadoop, the default admin user for JupyterHub, can be used to set up other users. The –password option sets the password for Jupyter and for the hadoop user for JupyterHub.

Installation is fairly straightforward, and they include a series of samples you can get to try out Jupyter.

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