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Category: Notebooks

Using Apache Flink in Zeppelin Notebooks

Jeff Zhang walks us through reviewing data streamed through Apache Flink in an Apache Zeppelin notebook:

In this post, we explained how the redesigned Flink interpreter works in Zeppelin 0.9.0 and provided some examples for performing streaming ETL jobs with Flink and Zeppelin. In the next post, I will talk about how to do streaming data visualization via Flink on Zeppelin. Besides that, you can find an additional tutorial for batch processing with Flink on Zeppelin as well as using Flink on Zeppelin for more advance operations like resource isolation, job concurrency & parallelism, multiple Hadoop & Hive environments and more on our series of posts on Medium. And here’s a list of Flink on Zeppelin tutorial videos for your reference.

Click through for the demo, and stay tuned for part 2.

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C# Notebooks with Cosmos DB

Hasan Savran takes us through Jupyter notebooks in Cosmos DB:

Jupyter Notebooks are in everywhere in these days. You can write chunk of code and run it on a web application without worrying about compiler is a great feeling. C# has been little bit late to the party, but we started to see C# Notebooks lately too. Azure Cosmos DB announced their version if C# Notebook this week.
     You can reach all notebook functionalities under the Data Explorer link, There are bunch of sample notebooks you will see under the Notebook link.

There are some limitations here, like needing to use the SQL API, but it’s an interesting approach to data access in Cosmos DB.

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Working with Jupyter Books in Azure Data Studio

Jamie Wick takes us through using Jupyter Book in Azure Data Studio:

The first thing to know is that Jupyter Books and “Jupyter Book support” (in Azure Data Studio) are slightly different concepts. Jupyter Books let you build web-based collections of Jupyter notebooks. Jupyter Books support allows you to build collections of Jupyter notebooks on your local computer or network (ie. not web-based). Additionally, all of the standards and functionality of the online Jupyter Books may not be fully supported/implemented in Azure Data Studio.

Click through for what this means as well as what the March 2020 release brought us.

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Generating Scripts as a Notebook in SSMS 18.5

Emanuele Meazzo is excited about some new functionality in SQL Server Management Studio 18.5:

Microsoft just dropped SSMS 18.5 after almost 5 long months without any updates; this new release fixes a lot of bugs and introduces a few new features, above them all I’m now showing you the following.

I’m sure that you used the the “Generate Scripts” feature in SSMS quite a few times, you could generate the code for schema and/or data for any (or all) the objects in your DB, especially if you haven’t embraced that sweet, elusive, devops workflow.

Well, good news! Other than file, clipboard and the good ‘o new query window, you can now export directly to a new Notebook.

Read on to see what you have to do and what the output looks like.

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Using Jupyter Notebooks in SQL Agent Jobs

Rob Sewell shows us how to run an Azure Data Studio notebook as a SQL Agent job:

Azure Data Studio is a great tool for connecting with your data platform whether it is in Azure or on your hardware. Jupyter Notebooks are fantastic, you can have words, pictures, code and code results all saved in one document.

I have created a repository in my Github https://beard.media/Notebooks where I have stored a number of Jupyter notebooks both for Azure Data Studio and the new .NET interactive notebooks.

Another thing that you can do with notebooks is run them as Agent Jobs and save the results of the run.

Read on to learn how.

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Working with Spark.Net on Azure Synapse Analytics

Paul Andrew takes a look at Spark.NET (or Spark.Net or dotnet-spark or however I’m calling it this time):

The main reason I wanted access to Synapse is to play around with Spark.Net via the Synapse workspace Notebooks. Currently if deploying Synapse via the public Azure portal you only get the option to create a SQL compute pool, formally known as an Azure SQLDW. While this is good, it gives us none of the exciting things that we were shown about Synapse back in November last year during the Microsoft Ignite conference.

To get the good stuff in Azure Synapse Analytics you need access to the full developer UI and Synapse Workspace.

Click through to learn more about the experience.

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Azure Data Studio March 2020 Release

Alan Yu announces the March 2020 release of Azure Data Studio:

Now you can add visualizations using a T-SQL query. In addition, as the gif illustrates, you can also customize your visualization whether it is a scatter or time series graph.

You can also copy your visualization or save the image so that you can quickly add this in an email or report to other team members.

We will continue to bring improvements to charting over the next few months.

They’ve put a lot of time and effort into notebooks. They’re still missing some of the quality of life improvements I want to see before moving to them full-time, but they’re consistently getting better.

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Using Pester with .NET Powershell Notebooks

Rob Sewell has Powershell in notebooks, so of course Rob is going to write tests:

Using Pester to validate that an environment is as you expect it is a good resource for incident resolution, potentially enabling you to quickly establish an area to concentrate on for the issue. However, if you try to run Pester in a .NET Notebook you will receive an error

Click through for the reason why this error appears and a workaround until it’s fixed for real.

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