SQLite With Powershell

Phil Factor combines SQLLite, Powershell, and SQL Server:

 Although I dearly love using SQL Server, I wouldn’t use it in every circumstance; there are times, for example, when just isn’t necessary to use a Server-based RDBMS for a data-driven application. The open-source SQLite is arguably the most popular and well-tried-and-tested database ever. It is probably in your phone, and used by your browser. Your iTunes will use it. Most single-user applications that need to handle data will use SQLite because it is so reliable and easy to install.

It is specifically designed as a zero-configuration, embedded, relational database with full ACID compliance, and a good simple dialect of SQL92. The SQLite library accesses its storage files directly, using a single library, written in C, which contains the entire database system. Creating a SQLite database instance is as easy as opening a simple cross-platform file that contains the entire database instance. It requires no administration.

There’s a lot going on in this interesting article; I recommend giving it a read.

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