Calling Cognitive Services With R

David Smith has written a go-to guide for connecting to Azure Cognitive Services using R:

There’s no official R package (yet!) for calling Cognitive Services APIs. But since every Cognitive Service API is just a standard REST API, we can use the httr package to call the API. Input and output is standard JSON, which we can create and extract using the jsonlite package.

(There’s also an independent R interface to the text APIs. And there are already Python SDKs for many of the services, including the Face API.)

This is also useful for other REST APIs for times when there isn’t already a pre-built package to do most of the translation work for you.

Saving DBCC Results

Kevin Feasel

2016-11-17

DBCC

Wayne Sheffield shows how to save CHECKDB results to table:

Okay, let’s try this out. At the above BOL links, there are two DBCC commands that are documented to use the TABLERESULTS option: OPENTRAN and SHOWCONTIG. Testing all of the other DBCC commands shows that this option can also be used on the CHECKALLOC, CHECKDB, CHECKFILEGROUP and CHECKTABLE commands. I’m going to continue this post with using DBCC CHECKDB. If you check BOL, it does not mention the TABLERESULTS option.

As Wayne notes, you can do this for other DBCC commands as well.

Graphing Row Counts With R

Kevin Feasel

2016-11-17

R

I look at one use of R for DBAs:

I have a client data warehouse which holds daily rollups of revenue and cost for customers.  We’ve had some issues with the warehouse lately where data was not getting loaded due to system errors and timeouts, and our services team gave me a list of some customers who had gaps in their data due to persistent processing failures.  I figured out the root cause behind this (which will show up as tomorrow’s post), but I wanted to make sure that we filled in all of the gaps.

My obvious solution is to write a T-SQL query, getting some basic information by day for each customer.  I could scan through that result set, but the problem is that people aren’t great at reading tables of numbers; they do much better looking at pictures.  This is where R comes into play.

Click through for the code and a walkthrough of what each line is doing.

Visualizing SQL Server Agent Jobs

Daniel Hutmacher shows how to visualize SQL Server Agent job runtimes using spatial data types:

If all you have is a hammer, everything will eventually start looking like a nail. This is generally known as Maslow’s hammer and refers to the fact that you use the tools you know to solve any problem, regardless if that’s what the problem actually needs. With that said, I frequently need a way to visualize the load distribution of scheduled jobs over a day or week, but I could never be bothered to set up a web server, learn a procedural programming language or build custom visualizations in PowerBI.

So here’s how to do that without leaving Management Studio.

Click through for discussion and link to the code.

NUMA-Aware Tabular Models

Bill Anton notes that Analysis Services Tabular is now NUMA-aware:

Wow, right on the heals of Azure AS and just when you thought things couldn’t get any better for SSAS geeks of the world… Microsoft releases SP1 for SQL Server 2016… an voila, Tabular is now NUMA-Aware!

Click through for more information.

New SSMS And SSDT

In this blast of new things, Andy Leonard makes mention that there are new versions of Management Studio and Data Tools available:

It’s Release Day! 🙂

New versions of SQL Server Data Tools (SSDT) are available here. SSDT 16.5 and 17.0 (RC1) are available. Also available are Data-Tier Application Framework (DacFx) versions 16.5 and 17.0 (RC1).

New versions of SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) are available here. SSMS 16.5 and 17.0 (RC1) versions are available for SSMS.

It’s going to be a busy couple of days for some people…

New Features In 2016 SP1

Niko Neugebauer looks at new functionality released as part of SQL Server 2016 SP1:

CREATE OR ALTER. I almost cried when I found out that it was implemented. I was asking, begging, threatening, crying for years to get this in the SQL Server. Now, I can finally have future project deployments of those who are not using SSDT running with much less problems.
Now we can modify and deploy objects like Stored Procedures, Triggers, User-Defined Functions, and Views without any fear. Just “Make it so!”

Yeah, they’re not as big as “every Enterprise Edition development feature over the past decade is now available to anybody” but there are some nice additions here.

Ola’s Jobs On Linux

Kevin Feasel

2016-11-17

Linux

Joey D’Antoni gives a few pointers around SQL Server on Linux, including running Ola Hallengren’s scripts on a system without a SQL Server Agent:

Aside from a couple of DMVs that show you Linux specific performance information, everything in SQL Server on Linux is the same. Some of the HA and DR functionality is not complete, and the SQL Agent is not done, however you can use cron (and if you’re familiar with Linux, you should learn about cron—I’ll have another post on that next week).

These are some good notes, so check it out.

Installing SQL Server On Ubuntu

Kevin Feasel

2016-11-17

Linux

James Anderson installs SQL Server on Ubuntu:

’m installing Ubuntu 16 on a Hyper-V VM. I’ll be using a generation 1 Hyper-V VM as I’ve had much better luck installing Linux VMs on these. I’ve had boot and performance issues with Linux on Generation 2 VMs.

After installing Ubuntu I followed the instructions in the SQL Server Linux documentation and recorded my progress below.

For Ubuntu we need to register the SQL Server repository before we can use the apt-get package manager to download and install SQL Server.

This step-by-step walkthrough shows that installing SQL Server on Linux is pretty easy:  it’s just a single package (RPM or DEB depending upon your flavor of Linux).

Categories

November 2016
MTWTFSS
« Oct Dec »
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930