Checking File Permissions

Andrew Peterson runs chmod 664 on a database backup:

You’re attempting to RESTORE a SQL Server database backup to your Linux installation and you get the message:

Msg 3201, Level 16, State 2, Line 17
Cannot open backup device ‘C:\home\user\Downloads\AdventureWorks2012.bak’.
Operating system error 2(The system cannot find the file
specified.).
Msg 3013, Level 16, State 1, Line 17
RESTORE HEADERONLY is terminating abnormally.

If you’re going to administer SQL Server on Linux, it’s a good idea to check out the Unix-style permissions model.  It’s a bit different than what we’re used to on Windows, though it does make sense with a bit of practice.

HDFS Cheat Sheet

Tim Spann has produced a guide for HDFS shell commands:

There are number of commands that you may need to use for administrating your cluster if you are one of the administrators for your cluster.   If you are running your own personal cluster or Sandbox, these are also good to know and try. Do Not Try These In Production if you are not the owner and fully understand the dire consequences of these actions.   These commands will be affecting the entire Hadoop cluster distributed file system.  You can shutdown data nodes, add quotas to directories for various users and other administrative features.

Many of the commands in this list should be familiar if you know much about Linux or Unix administration, but there are some Hadoop-specific commands as well, like moveFromLocal and moveToLocal.

Changing Font Sizes

Jay Robinson has a couple Visual Studio Settings files to change Management Studio font sizes:

I present technical sessions now and then – my local PASS group, SQL Saturdays, internal groups at my workplace, etc. I frequently find myself adjusting the fonts inside SQL Server Management Studio to make sure my material is readable on the big screen. I’ve also been in the audience plenty of times, watching with sympathy as one of my cohorts agonizingly navigates this problem.

Usually, it goes something like this. They first find the [100%] tucked away in the lower left corner of the text window, and blow that up to 150 or 200 percent. Then they run their query to find that the results are still at 100%. So then they eventually find the Options dialog under the Tools menu, find the Fonts and Colors branch of the tree, and then groan when they realize they have to figure out which three or four of the 30 different fonts they need to change. Sometimes, they’ll give up there and just go use ZoomIt (which any good technical presenter should have available anyway), but constantly bouncing around with ZoomIt will get old quickly over the course of an hour-long session.

Having VSSettings files is a good idea, although I’ve noticed oddities when also trying to change colors (e.g., darker theme for regular development but a lighter theme for presentations), so test out any settings files you want to use and make sure you can swap back and forth without seeing weird behavior.

Viewing Power BI Audit Logs

Ginger Grant shows how to give a Power BI Administrator rights to view the audit logs:

The Audit Logs are the third menu item in the Power BI Admin Portal. As you can tell by looking at a copy of the screen below, Audit Logs are not really part of Power BI. Yes the ability to log all of the content in Power BI exists in the Audit Logs, but so does the ability to review the audit logs for things like Exchange Mailbox Activities and User Administration Activities.

If the Office 365 Administrator has granted a user Power BI Administration rights, this is what the newly minted Power BI Administrator will see when trying to access any search activities. It appears that you the user has rights, until that user tries to do anything on the screen. At that point, this error window appears.

Click through to see how to grant audit log access.

HAL0003

Kenneth Fisher is on a mission:

  • HAL0001 randomly stopped you from making DDL changes.

  • HAL0002 stopped you from using NOLOCK in code.

  • HAL0003 will not let you touch a given table (DiscoveryOne as it happens) and will disable your login and kill your connection if you try.

He’s got a ways to go, but I applaud his long-term vision.

Uninstalling SQL Server 2016 SP1

David Alcock sounds an important note:

All of that is very good however a word of warning has been issued from the MSSQL Tiger Team if you are using SP1 on the “lower” version:”you might see some unforeseen errors or databases might even be left in suspect state after uninstallation of SQL Server 2016 SP1. Even worse would be if the system databases are using new features for example, partitioned table in master database, it can lead to SQL Server instance unable to start after uninstalling SQL Server 2016 SP1″.

This makes sense:  if you’re using new functionality and try to revert back to a version without that functionality available, there could be an issue.  David links to a test script you can use to see if your database is using any new features.

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