Capturing SSAS Query Activity

Bill Anton explains why and how he captures query activity by user in SSAS:

In most environments, it is trivial to obtain the name of the user who ran each query… all you have to do was capture the [QueryEnd] event in a profiler/xevent trace and pull the information from the [NTUserName] field. However, in environments involving Power BI and the Enterprise On-Premise Data Gateway, there’s a bit more to it.

The main issue is how authentication is handled in this type of architecture. When working with Power BI reports connected to an on-premise data source via the On-Premise Data Gateway, the account of the user running the report is passed as the “EffectiveUsername”. The implication here is that the value shown in the [NTUserName] field of the xevent/profiler trace is going to be the Data Gateway account – NOT the account of the user who actually generated the activity.

Read on for the full answer.

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