Suppress Assembly Output

Richie Lee shows how to hide assembly load information in a Powershell script:

Recently I’ve been wondering how I can suppress the output in my PowerShell scripts when loading assemblies into them. I used to find them useful; but now I find them annoying and they are no substitute for error handling ( I used to find them handy as a way of telling me that the script had got this far in the script).

There is more than one way to suppress output to the console, but for assembly loading, I prefer to use [void] because it looks neater than the alternatives:

I’d never used this technique; I always piped to $null.

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