Suppress Assembly Output

Richie Lee shows how to hide assembly load information in a Powershell script:

Recently I’ve been wondering how I can suppress the output in my PowerShell scripts when loading assemblies into them. I used to find them useful; but now I find them annoying and they are no substitute for error handling ( I used to find them handy as a way of telling me that the script had got this far in the script).

There is more than one way to suppress output to the console, but for assembly loading, I prefer to use [void] because it looks neater than the alternatives:

I’d never used this technique; I always piped to $null.

Related Posts

More dbatools Changes

Chrissy LeMaire has a few more breaking changes for us: It’s been a busy couple days! Here’s a list of our breaking changes Invoke-Sqlcmd2 has been removed and replaced with a warning to use Invoke-DbaQuery The NetworkShare parameter has been renamed to SharedPath UseLastBackups has been renamed to UseLastBackup There are also several new commands […]

Read More

Working With The Databricks API Via Powershell

Gerhard Brueckl has a Powershell module for interacting with Databricks, either Azure or AWS: As most of our deployments use PowerShell I wrote some cmdlets to easily work with the Databricks API in my scripts. These included managing clusters (create, start, stop, …), deploying content/notebooks, adding secrets, executing jobs/notebooks, etc. After some time I ended […]

Read More

Categories

July 2016
MTWTFSS
« Jun Aug »
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031