Visiting Production

Randolph West discusses production access:

During a recent client meeting about a database migration, I realised that I have never logged into a SQL Server on their production environment. My involvement has been strictly dealing with setting up the new environment and log shipping the backups.

I get that I’m not a full-service DBA for this client, but it got me wondering about the many security discussions I’ve seen and participated in, in the past: that not even a junior DBA might need access to production database systems, if it’s not within the scope of his or her work.

Limiting production access is a smart move, but it’s important to realize the downstream consequences:  the people who still have access to production will (at least in the short term) have to perform a lot of the tasks that others were doing previously, including data fixes, research, etc.  It’s important to be prepared for that.

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