Check Those Backups

Andy Galbraith walks us through a backup issue he experienced recently:

These messages showed that a process of some kind ran just after 9 pm that switched the databases from FULL recovery to SIMPLE and then back again.  This broke the LOG recovery chain and required new FULL backups before any LOG backups could succeed, which is why the LOG backup job was failing.

This sort of interesting user behavior is why it’s so important to have automated systems in place to check for issues and, whenever possible, fix them.

Relational Lives On

Tony Davis on NoSQL:

There have been some spectacular examples where the lack of transactional integrity of NOSQL databases led to financial disaster. Even ardent NoSQL enthusiasts did U-turns on the value of ACID-compliance. And therefore, slowly, inexorably many NoSQL database begin to acquire the essential characteristics of a relational database. MongoDB now offers joins; N1QL and U-SQL bring good old SQL-style querying to “NoSQL” data. Many of the NoSQL databases are now laboring towards some form of proper transactional support.

I enjoyed Robert Young’s first comment:

the notion that NoSql “databases” are more flexible isn’t even true: chaotic, yes. but flexible means being able to move without breaking, and NoSql, due to the lack of schema, means that all manner of inconsistencies and redundancies are allowed. that’s not flexible, that’s nuts.

Windows Server Licensing Changes

Allan Hirt prepares us for a licensing letdown:

Say Hello to Core-based Licensing for Windows Server

This is the one that may annoy most folks. Like SQL Server, Windows Server 2016 licensing will be core-based, including the Core Infrastructure Suite SKU. Historically, Windows pricing has been MUCH lower than SQL Server, and no prices have been announced. So before anyone has a conniption, let’s see what the core pricing will be based on the chart shown on page 2, there are cases where the cost may be the same as it is today.

I’m now curious about how many people will hit a wall with Windows Server editions like we’ve seen with SQL Server 2008 R2.

Azure SQL Database Threat Detection

Troy Hunt introduces us to a fantastic new feature with Azure SQL Databases:

Azure has just introduced another tool to help in the fight against SQL injection known as SQL Database Threat Detection. You can go and read all the Microsofty bits there or watch it work in a real live app here.

Firstly, this is threat detection, not prevention. In a nutshell, this feature will tell you when an attack is mounted against your database and in order to do that, the upstream app has to have a vulnerability in it that’s allowing the attack to get that far. Now before you give it a bit of “well that’s pretty useless then”, the main reason this makes sense is that you can go and enable it with a single checkbox tick and it won’t break your things. Plus, even if the code is solid and you have a device or a service like a WAF, this is just one more layer that’s good to have in place. Let’s just jump into it.

This is a useful tool. If you’re using Azure SQL Databases, go forth and activate this.

Ending A Powershell Loop

Steve Jones shows how to end a loop early:

That’s fine, but it’s not a great loop. It runs 9999 times, which isn’t what I want. It works, but it’s an unnecessary use of resources. However I don’t want to break the loop when the file file isn’t found. There have been issues generating a file, like #350, when #351 exists and is there.

I decided to use a shortcut technique I had learned as a kid. I set a variable and then incremented it when I missed a file. When the increment reaches some value, I break the loop.

I’d just as soon use a break statement, but there are many ways to skin a cat.

Categories

December 2015
MTWTFSS
« Nov Jan »
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031