Whither CLR?

Joey D’Antoni is shaking his head about a CLR announcement:

With this is mind, Microsoft has made some big changes to CLR in SQL Server 2017. SQL CLR has always been an interesting area of the engine—it allows for the use of .NET code in stored procedures and user defined types. For certain tasks , it’s an extremely powerful tool—things like RegEx and geo functions can be much faster in native CLR than trying to do the equivalent operation in T-SQL. It’s always been a little bit of a security risk, since under certain configurations, CLR had access to resources outside of the context of the database engine. This was protected by boundaries defined in the CLR host policy. We had SAFE, EXTERNAL_ACCESS, and UNSAFE levels that we could set. SAFE simply limited access of the assembly to internal computation and local data access. For the purposes of this post, we will skip UNSAFE and EXTERNAL_ACCESS, but it is sufficed to say, these levels allow much deeper access to the rest of the server.

Code Access Security in .NET (which is used to managed these levels) has been marked obsolete. What does this mean? The boundaries that are marked SAFE, may not be guaranteed to provide security. So “SAFE” CLR may be able to access external resources, call unmanaged code, and acquire sysadmin privileges. This is really bad.

It’s not the end of the world for CLR, but this is a breaking change.  Read on for more details.

SQL Server Regex

Kevin Feasel

2016-12-30

CLR, T-SQL

Dev Nambi has a new open-source project:

Databases store text, and the best way to manipulate text is to use a regular expression (‘regex’). Using regular expressions in SQL queries has been possible in many database engines for decades.

Now you can use regular expressions in SQL Server queries, too. I’ve created an open-source project, sql-server-regex, that lets you run regular expressions in T-SQL queries using scalar and table-valued functions.

This is a set of CLR functions which use the built-in .NET regular expressions functionality.  That makes it pretty easy to see how the code works.

CLR Survey

Kevin Feasel

2016-07-28

CLR

Michael J. Swart wants to know if you’re using CLR in your environment:

CREATE ASSEMBLY supports specifying a CLR assembly using bits, a bit stream that can be specified using regular T-SQL. The full method is described in Deploying CLR Database Objects. In practice, the CREATE ASSEMBLY statement looks something like:

After learning about assembly deployment, check out Michael’s one-question survey.

CLR Turned Off In Azure SQL Database

Brent Ozar reports that Azure SQL Database’s CLR will be turned off:

Details are still coming in, but in the Reddit AMA for the Azure database teams (going on as we speak), it’s one of the users reports that they got an email that SQL CLR will be shut off in one week due to a security issue.

The cloud: at the end of the day, it’s just someone else’s server, and they can – and will – take tough actions to protect their product, their users, their security, and their profits.

I’m curious for more details.  I’d like to know if this is particular to Azure or affect on-prem installations as well.

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