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Category: T-SQL Tuesday

T-SQL Tuesday 118 Roundup

Kevin Chant played Santa Claus this month:

I hope they had as much fun contributing their posts as I had reading them afterwards. For those who missed the invitation you can read about it here.

For some reason I thought it’d be a good idea to do it on my birthday month when I first given choices about which month to host. However, now I cannot remember why.

Read on for 23 separate blog posts covering quite a few peoples’ desires for new features, bugfixes, or changes in functionality.

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T-SQL Tuesday 117 Roundup

Steve Jones has the roundup for this month’s T-SQL Tuesday:

The summary from my fourth T-SQL Tuesday hosting for #117. This time I was scrambling a bit, but since I’ve worked with a few customers in the last year that use MOT tables, I thought this might be a good topic.

Either everyone is on vacation or not many people think about them. Or maybe they aren’t interesting. In any case, here’s the roundup.

I’d like to say it’s because everyone’s on vacation, but I think In-Memory OLTP is an underutilized technology. Granted, there are reasons why it’s not used as much as it should be—early versions were too limiting and could have weird consequences on your servers—but if you’re on SQL Server 2017, it’s worth another look.

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Memory-Optimized Table Types

Rob Farley hates spelling “optimized” the best way:

Let me start by saying that if you really want to get the most out of this feature, you will dive deep into questions like durability and natively-compiled stored procedures, which can really make your database fly if the conditions are right. Arguably, any process you’re doing (such as ETL) where the data doesn’t have to survive a system restart should be considered for Memory-Optimized Tables with durability set to SCHEMA_ONLY (I say ‘considered’ because the answer isn’t always obvious – at the moment inserting into memory-optimised tables won’t run in parallel, and this could be a show-stopper for you).

But today I’m going to mention one of the quick-wins available: Table Variables that use User-defined Table Types

This can absolutely help you out, especially in versions of SQL Server prior to 2019 where temporary object metadata contention is a real issue on busy servers.

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T-SQL Tuesday 116 Roundup

Tracy Boggiano hosted this month’s T-SQL Tuesday, on the topic of SQL Server on Linux:

I noticed a common theme in how easy it is to install SQL on Linux that tells me if you didn’t think you had time to install SQL on Linux then you probably do and should give a try in the near future.

Thanks for all that participated!

Let me put it this way: one of my employees, who had never really worked with SQL Server before, got SQL Server on Linux installed through Docker in about 15 minutes. It’s really easy to do.

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T-SQL Tuesday 115 Roundup

Mohammad Darab has a roundup for this month’s T-SQL Tuesday:

It was an absolute honor to host this month’s TSQL Tuesday. I decided on doing the “Dear 20 year old self” as a way for us to reflect on life. It seemed like this topic hit home with a lot of people. I enjoyed reading each one of the posts.

If you don’t find your post in this Round Up, please email me your link and I will update this post!

There were 14 responses this month; click through for the full set.

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T-SQL Tuesday 114 Roundup

Matthew McGiffen wraps up another T-SQL Tuesday:

Here’s my round-up for this month’s T-SQL Tuesday.

Thanks to everyone who contributed last week. It was great reading your posts and seeing the different ways you interpreted the puzzle theme.

We had real-life problems, we had SQL coding questions, we had puzzles, we had solutions, we had games, and we had the imaginarium.

Click through for thirteen blog posts.

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Puzzling Through Older Problems

Kenneth Fisher shares a couple of interview puzzles:

The year is 2004. You’re taking a tech test as an interview for a SQL development job. They have a page in their application that displays up to 20 rows of information. They need a piece of code that will return the rows from a given page. Oh, and it may not always be 20 rows per page. You need to write a piece of code where they can pass in a page number and page size and get back results. So for example, if the page size is 20 and the page is 3 then you need to return back rows 41 to 60.

The answers aren’t on the page, but then again, that’s the point of a puzzle.

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The SSMS Magic 8 Ball

Bert Wagner has fun with SSMS:

As a kid, I found Magic 8 Balls alluring. There is something appealing about a who-knows-how-many-sides die emerging from the depths of a mysterious inky blue fluid to help answers life’s most difficult questions.

I never ended up buying a magic eight ball of my own though, so today I’m going to build and animate one in SQL Server Management Studio.

Now you can finally answer those important life questions without leaving Management Studio.

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T-SQL Tuesday 113 Roundup

Todd Kleinhans takes us through T-SQL Tuesday #113:

Wow, we had a variety of responses to the April 2019 topic of “What Do YOU Use Databases For?

I think the overall response to the question and the theme is both mixed and varied.

I have been struggling with the personal use of databases for a long time. Things I wish would have been easier but seems to just get more complicated over time. Ever heard of GDPR? Although we think we have absolute control and access to data about ourselves, we really do not. The right to be forgotten is NOT the same as having access to all of the data about ourselves in all of the systems before they disappear. Sometimes companies will delete your data about you before you ask.

Todd starts out with an essay and then moves on to the roundup.

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T-SQL Tuesday 112 Roundup

Shane O’Neill has a roundup of T-SQL Tuesday #112:

I’m going to keep this intro short and sweet. I’d like to say it’s because I know these roundups are for acknowledging and thanking the people who have contributed, and this is the case! Mainly though it’s because I wrote this bit last and I’ve already written… checks … 2,795 words!

So thank you one and all for participating. I’ve never thought the posts would raise feelings of happiness, sadness, thoughtfulness, and appreciative-ness that this one has.

Read on for the full list and Shane’s thoughts.

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