T-SQL Tuesday Roundup

Ewald Cress has what might have been the largest T-SQL Tuesday ever:

Firstly, I want to thank every person who took part. SIXTY TWO blog posts got generated, including a few first-time #tsql2sday contributors as well as first-time bloggers. I am fairly glowing to have been a part of it, and I hope the other contributors are too.

Secondly, from my own experience in writing a post, I know it feels terrible when you start worrying about who to pick. There are many people I could have included, but I hope I have made my appreciation for them clear elsewhere. Not that I want to speak on your behalf, but I’ll assume that the same applies to many other contributors.

That’s a lot of reading.

T-SQL Tuesday Roundup

Derik Hammer has an early roundup for this month’s T-SQL Tuesday:

This month’s T-SQL Tuesday was all about Big Data. See what the community has to say about Big Data with this collection of articles ranging from deep technical walk-throughs to musings about Big Data’s impact on our industry and the data professional.

Click through to see the participants.

Polybase And HDInsight

I have a post up on trying to integrate Polybase with HDInsight:

But now we run into a problem:  there are certain ports which need to be open for Polybase to work.  This includes port 50010 on each of the data nodes against which we want to run MapReduce jobs.  This goes back to the issue we see with spinning up data nodes in Docker:  ports are not available.  If you’ve put your HDInsight cluster into an Azure VNet and monkey around with ports, you might be able to open all of the ports necessary to get this working, but that’s a lot more than I’d want to mess with, as somebody who hasn’t taken the time to learn much about cloud networking.

As I mention in the post, I’d much rather build my own Hadoop cluster; I don’t think you save much maintenance time in the long run going with HDInsight.

Working With CosmosDB

Derik Hammer has an introductory article showing how to work with CosmosDB to store and use document-style data:

Querying Cosmos DB is more powerful and versatile. The CreateDocumentQuery method is used to create an IQueryable<T> object, a member of System.Linq, which can output the query results. The ToList() method will output a List<T> object from the System.Collections.Generic namespace.

Derik also shows how to import the data into Power BI and visualize it.  It’s a nice article if you’ve never played with CosmosDB before.

The Database Dialectic

Rob Farley sees a series of database syntheses, and the Big Data movement is a part of that:

When CLR came in, people said it was a T-SQL killer. I remember a colleague of mine telling me that he didn’t need to learn T-SQL, because CLR meant that he would be able to do it all in .Net. Over time, we’ve learned that CLR is excellent for all kinds of things, but it’s by no means a T-SQL killer. It’s excellent for a number of reasons – CLR stored procedures or functions have been great for things like string splitting and regular expressions – and we’ve learned its place now.

I don’t hear people talking about NoSQL like they once did, and it’s been folded somehow into BigData, but even that seems to have lost a little of its lustre from a year or two ago when it felt like it was ‘all the rage’. And yet we still have data which is “Big”. I don’t mean large, necessarily, just data that satisfies one of the three Vs – volume, velocity, variety.

Rob brings an interesting perspective to the topic, particularly as one of the early Parallel Data Warehouse bloggers.

The Market For IoT Analytics

Kennie Nybo Pontoppidan tells a story for T-SQL Tuesday:

At the time in Rehfeld R&D, we experimented with making Effektor a metadata repository for a Hadoop data warehouse, where instead of generating tables and ETL processes in the different data warehouse layers, the synchronization engine in the product would generate the Hive objects on top of Hadoop tables. We never made more than an overall spec and a prototype, but the experiment gave us some insight into the technologies around Hadoop.

Around that time, Phillips released the Hue lightbulbs, and our COO bought us two packs to play with. The idea was to create a physical BI dashboard, where lightbulbs would display KPIs, and change color according to its value and the KPI threshold. I still think that was a brilliant idea, and I would love to see more use of consumer electronics in enterprise BI.

His basic maturity model makes sense; as much as I really want to disagree with the maturity model, I can’t.  Good read.

T-SQL Tuesday Roundup

Rob Sewell has this month’s T-SQL Tuesday roundup:

But anyway, on to the TSQL2sDay posts

What a response. You wonderful people. I salute you with a Rimmer salute

Read on for an amazing 34 entries.

Testing Backups With dbatools

Constantine Kokkinos shows off a dbatools cmdlet to test the last full backup:

This:

  • Defines a list of two servers (PowerShell lists are as easy as “”,””)

  • Pipes them to the Test-DbaLastBackup command.

  • Which then:

    • Gathers information about the last full backups for all of your databases on that instance.

    • Restores the backups to the Destination with a new name. If no Destination is specified, the originating server will be used.

    • The database is restored as “dbatools-testrestore-$databaseName” by default, which you can change with the -Prefix parameter.

    • The internal file names are also renamed to prevent conflicts with original database.

    • A DBCC CHECKTABLE is then performed.

    • And the test database is finally dropped.

Pretty snazzy.

Log Shipping With dbatools

Sander Stad shows off a few log shipping functions he created for dbatools:

The entire log shipping functionality is now separated between 5 functions. Four of them are used internally and are not visible as a public function because you can easily break stuff if it’s not being used correctly.

The main function, Invoke-DbaLogShipping, is available in the dbatools module for anyone to use.

If you open the GUI for the log shipping you have lots of choices but most of them are already supplied in the GUI itself and you can decide whether to use them or not.
The whole idea behind the functionality was that it would allow you to quickly setup log shipping using a lot of defaults like you can in the GUI, but if you’re more experienced you can change any setting to your preferences.

Read on for an example of how to use this.  It looks pretty snazzy.

Loading From Excel Into SQL Server With Powershell

Shane O’Neill tackles one of the all-time important questions, how to get data from Excel into something else:

Now let’s say that we are working in an environment that does not allow us to change the server configurations, meaning that OPENROWSET() is closed for us.

Being completely honest, my spreadsheet is only 8 rows so I would just manually insert the data but what happens if it’s a few thousand rows big? Not a viable option.

So with most of my T-SQL ideas have been exhausted, let’s look at PowerShell!

The other all-time important question, of course, is how to get data from something else into Excel.

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