Slipstream Installation Of SQL Server

Randolph West shows how to install a pre-patched version of SQL Server:

For this example, we will be using the SQL Server 2017 Developer Edition RTM (called en_sql_server_2017_developer_x64_dvd_11296168.iso), and Cumulative Update 11 (called SQLServer2017-KB4462262-x64.exe), which was the latest CU available at the time of this writing.

Place the Cumulative Update in a folder that will contain the patch files. On older versions of SQL Server, this could comprise the latest Service Pack, Cumulative Updates, as well as additional hotfixes you may wish to apply. For instance, as of this writing, SQL Server 2016 requires Service Pack 2, Cumulative Update 3 for Service Pack 2, and two more hotfixes to bring it up to date. We would have to have all four files in this folder.

The actual path does not matter as long as we keep track of where they are. For the purposes of this post, we will assume they are stored in C:\Temp.

Definitely a good idea if you’re installing SQL Server regularly.

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