Connecting To Elasticsearch With R

Jerod Johnson has a sample of connecting to Elasticsearch with R:

You will need the following information to connect to Elasticsearch as a JDBC data source:

  • Driver Class: Set this to cdata.jdbc.elasticsearch.ElasticsearchDriver.
  • Classpath: Set this to the location of the driver JAR. By default, this is the lib subfolder of the installation folder.

The DBI functions, such as dbConnect anddbSendQuery , provide a unified interface for writing data access code in R. Use the following line to initialize a DBI driver that can make JDBC requests to the CData JDBC Driver for Elasticsearch:

Read on for the full instructions.

An Incompatible SQL Server Version Was Detected

Hamish Watson troubleshoots an issue with Visual Studio 2017 connecting to SQL Server 2017:

This blog post details the error you may get when using Visual Studio 2017 and you get errors that you cannot connect to SQL Server 2017 using Test Explorer or SQL Server Object Explorer.

TL;DR – upgrade Visual Studio from base version…..

Read on for Hamish’s explanation.

APPROX_COUNT_DISTINCT

Kevin Feasel

2018-10-15

T-SQL

Niko Neugebauer is happy with a new function in SQL Server 2019:

A rather interesting result takes place if we scale our database to 100GB TPCH and run the very same queries – the total elapsed time jumps to 50% difference (from 30%), the CPU execution time difference is kept at 50%, but the memory grant gives the biggest difference ever – those 24.476 MB are still intact for the APPROX_DISTINCT_COUNT, while the COUNT(DISTINCT) asks for just a bit over 11GB ! Besides going through a completely different gateway on the bigger machines, running COUNT(DISTINCT) will bring your system to a full stop way before the same will take place with the APPROX_DISTINCT_COUNT.
Regarding the precision – in my tests I did not see the difference going over 1%.

Test before using this function, but if you don’t the correct number and can make do with “close enough,” this can save a boatload of memory on larger tables.

Word Counts In DAX

Kevin Feasel

2018-10-15

DAX

Philip Seamark shows us a way of splitting strings into words in DAX:

Here is a technique you might consider if you need to split text down to individual words.  This could be used to help count, rank or otherwise aggregate the words in some longer text.  The approach detailed here uses spaces as a delimiter and will not be tripped up if multiple spaces are used between words.

There is no SPLIT function in DAX, so this approach uses the MID function to help find words.

The PBIX file used for the blog can be downloaded here.

[Updated 14th Oct, 2018]
A slightly updated version that uses UNICHAR/UNICODE to preserve the case (“A” versus “a”) of each letter can be downloaded here. The reason for this is DAX stores a dictionary of unique values for every column.  It is the first instance of any value that is added to the dictionary and assigned a new ID.  Subsequent values that are considered the same “A” and “a” are considered the same are assigned the same ID.  Using the UNICHAR/UNICODE version helps preserve the original case of each letter.

It’s an interesting approach and reminded me a bit of using a tally table to split strings in T-SQL.

External Memory Pressure In SQL Server 2019 On Linux

Anthony Nocentino walks us through memory pressure in SQL Server on Linux:

Now in SQL Server 2017 with that 7GB program running would cause Linux to need to make room in physical memory for this process. Linux does this by swapping least recently used pages from memory out to disk. So under external memory pressure, let’s look at the SQL Server process’ memory allocations according to Linux. In the output below we see we still have a VmSize of around 10GB, but our VmRSS value has decreased dramatically. In fact, our VmRSS is now only 2.95GB. VmSwap has increased to 5.44GB. Wow, that’s a huge portion of the SQL Server process swapped to disk.

In SQL Server 2019, there’s a different outcome! In the data below we see our 16GB VmSize which won’t change much because of the virtual address space for the process. With that large external process running SQL Server reduced VmRSS from 7.9GB (from Table 1) to 2.8GB only placing about 4.68GB in the swap file. That doesn’t sound much better, does it? I thought SQL Server was going to react to the external memory pressure…let’s keep digging and ask SQL Server what it thinks about this.

Anthony is doing some great work digging into this.  This is an area where you do have to understand the differences between Windows and Linux.

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