Forcing A Plan Is A Temporary Solution

Erin Stellato explains when she forces plans—and that this is not a permanent solution to a performance problem:

Whether you force plans manually, or let SQL Server force them with the Automatic Plan Correction feature, I still view plan forcing as a temporary solution.  I don’t expect you to have plans forced for years, let alone months.  The life of a forced plan will, of course, depend on how quickly code and schema changes are ported to production.  If you go the “set it and forget it route”, theoretically a manually forced plan could get used for a very long time.  In that scenario, it’s your responsibility to periodically check to ensure that plan is still the “best” one for the query.  I would be checking every couple weeks; once a month at most.  Whether or not the plan remains optimal depends on the tables involved in the query, the data in the tables, how that data changes (if it changes), other schema changes that may be introduced, and more.

Further, you don’t want to ignore forced plans because there are cases where a forced plan won’t be used (you can use Extended Events to monitor this).  When you force a plan manually, forcing can still fail.  For example, if the forced plan uses an index and the index is dropped, or its definition is changed to the point where it cannot be used in plan in the same manner, then forcing will fail.  Important note: if forcing fails, the query will go through normal optimization and compilation and it will execute; SQL Server does not want your query to fail!  If you’re forcing plans and not familiar with the reasons that it can fail, note the last_force_failure_reason values listed for sys.query_store_plan.  If you have manually forced a plan for a query, and the force plan fails, it remains forced.  You have to manually un-force it to stop SQL Server from trying to use that plan.  As you can see, there are multiple factors related to plan forcing, which is why you don’t just force a plan and forget it.

There is much sound advice in this post.

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