Detecting Data Breaches

K. Brian Kelley shares some thoughts on methods to detect data breaches:

We’re going to make some assumptions. First, we’ll assume no one is above suspicion. After all, a trusted employee who gets hit and falls to a phishing attack is still trustworthy, but his or her user account isn’t. Even the best can fall to such an attack. Therefore, we’ll assume every account is capable of being used for a data breach.

Second, we’ll accept as a given that there are insecure protocols and insecure procedures/behavior. From a technology side we can do some things about those areas, but there are still too many situations we can’t deal with by using technology alone. For instance, I know of a case where a client had an employee find several hundred printed pages of sensitive information just left sitting in a publicly accessible smoking area. Using Extended Events in SQL Server can’t fix that type of lapse in security. However, rather than throwing our hands up because we can’t prevent this type of situation by some configuration within SQL Server, we’ll endeavor to do what we can with what SQL Server can do for us.

As a corollary, we’ll assume that discovering data breaches is hard. If all we have is what’s in SQL Server, the odds are stacked against us. Even with sophisticated tools, detecting a breach is still a difficult endeavor. However, we’ll do our best to set up methods of detection using what we can within SQL Server.

Finally, we’ll acknowledge there’s a lot of data we can collect. That data is useless if we can’t sift through it, so we’ll take an approach that will reduce the amount of data we do collect and try to examine. Let’s look at what that approach consists of.

Worth reading in its entirety.

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