Using DATETIMEOFFSET

Randolph West continues his date and time data type series:

DATETIMEOFFSET works the same way as the DATETIME2 data type, except that it is also time zone aware. It is formatted as 'YYYY-MM-DD HH:mm:ss[.nnnnnnn][{+|-}hh:mm]'.

Got all that? YYYY represents a four-digit year, MM is a two-digit month between 1 and 12, DD is a two-digit day between 1 and 31 depending on the month, HH represents a two-digit hour between 0 and 23, mm is the minutes between 0 and 59, while ss is the number of seconds between 0 and 59. Once again, n represents between zero and seven decimal places in a fraction of a second.

The main difference from DATETIME2 is the time zone offset at the end, which is the number of hours and minutes as an offset from UTC time.

Read on for more.  I generally don’t use this date type much, preferring to stick with DATETIME2 and saving data as UTC.

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