The Basics Of Jupyter Notebooks

Nigel Meakings has an introductory post to Jupyter Notebooks:

The Jupyter notebok environment consists of a browser-based notebook UI and a back-end server, running on port 8888 by default (if this port is taken it will start up on the next available port). This web server-based delivery of Notebooks means that you can browse to a remote server and execute your code there. This is the case, for example, when using a ready-made cluster such as an HDInsight Spark cluster, where all the tooling has been pre-installed for you. You open the notebook in the cluster portal within Azure, and it logs you in to the Jupyter server running on a node within the cluster. Note that if you want to allow multi-user access to your local Jupyter environment, you’ll need to be running a product such as JupyterHub.

I love using Jupyter when presenting because it’s the easiest way to intermix code, documentation, and images in one package, so it’s nice for pedagogical purposes.

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