Measuring Progress With Power BI

Stacia Varga shows how to use Power BI to simplify data analysis, using the example of New Year’s resolution goals:

First, the actual data represents the accumulation of data by day from the beginning of the year, whereas the target data represents the final tally at the end of a defined period. Each goal has a different frequency: daily, quarterly, and weekly. Currently, the comparison between actual and target data makes it appear that I’m falling way short of my goals. However, even if I were making solid progress on my goals on a daily basis, the comparison of the two values will never meet until the end of the defined period for any given goal. I need a way to prorate the target data so that I can more reasonably measure my progress.

Second, displaying the actual and target values in a table requires me to do mental math to determine how close (or not) I am to achieving my goals. Now, I’m pretty good at mental math, but a better way to see progress is to use data visualizations. I’m sure you’ve heard the saying… A picture is worth a thousand words.

This is a great post if you’re interested in getting started with Power BI.

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