Failover Groups In Azure SQL Database

Jim Donahoe shows off Failover Groups in Azure SQL Database.  Part 1 involves setting up a Failover Group:

In my former company, we had 22 web applications that all had connections to various databases.  We had all of our databases configured for Geo-Replication already, but still if we had to failover, we had to update each connection string for the web apps along with others which became a tedious process. In came Failover Groups to the rescue!  With a Failover Group, I was able to create two endpoints that stayed the same no matter which server was primary/secondary.  I liked to think of these as my Availability Group Listeners as they kinda serve the same functionality: Route traffic to a node depending on if its read-only or not.  Best part?  It’s configured through the Azure Portal SO EASILY!  You can use PowerShell as well, but for this blog post, I will walk through the creation via the Portal.  I will make a separate post or attach a script at some point for the PowerShell deployment.

Before we start the configuration portion of this though, let’s take a look at how Microsoft defines what a Failover Group is.  I found this definition here:  “Azure SQL Database auto-failover groups (in-preview) is a SQL Database feature designed to automatically manage geo-replication relationship, connectivity, and failover at scale.”  Sounds pretty interesting, right? Let’s make one!

In Part 2, Jim shows how to connect to SQL Server using the Failover Group listener:

Well, now that the easy stuff is out of the way, let’s talk about how you connect to these groups via SSMS.  This is where some of the confusion happens.  When I first configured a Failover Group, the first thing I tried to do was connect to the Primary server via SSMS thinking it will work just like an Always On Listener in traditional SQL Server…NEWP!

If you’re running a production database on Azure SQL Database, you might want to look at Failover Groups.

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